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Image from page 495 of “History of Nebraska from the earliest explorations of the trans-Mississippi region” (1918)
Chicago
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Identifier: historyofnebrask00mort
Title: History of Nebraska from the earliest explorations of the trans-Mississippi region
Year: 1918 (1910s)
Authors: Morton, J. Sterling (Julius Sterling), 1832-1902 Watkins, Albert, 1848-1923 Thomas, Augustus Orloff, 1863-1935 Beattie, James A., 1845- Wakeley, Arthur Cooper, 1855-
Subjects: Nebraska — History
Publisher: Lincoln, Neb., Western Publishing and Engraving Company

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to the southern route was demoral-ized where it was not devastated by warthe other hand, the great natural I Matte riverroute was in direct line westward with the rial tier of states of which Chicago hadalready become the commercial entrepot, and at least four trunk lines of railway from thatgreat central point would naturally reach the 47. HISTORY OF NEBRASKA Missouri river north of the line between Iowaand Missouri and within reach of the in-fluence of the Platte route magnet. The actof 1864 provided that any company having aline reaching Sioux City from the east mightbuild the Sioux City & Pacific branch. Inorder to avail themselves of lands then morevaluable than those lying across the Missouri,the builders, John I. Blair and Oakes Ames,kept the road on the Iowa side to a point op-posite Blair, and then made the connection atFremont. This branch was never a part ofthe Union Pacific system, and in 1884 it fellinto the control of the Chicago & Northwes-tern railroad company.

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Thomas C. DurantChief promoter, Union Pacific railroad There was a bitter controversy in Congressover the passage of the amendatory act of1864, and the opposition in the House was ledby two eminent members, E. B. Washburneof Illinois, a republican, and William H. Hol-man of Indiana, a democrat. Mr. Holmandemanded that provision should be made forcarrying the property and troops of the UnitedStates free of charge, and he predicted thatthe government would get nothing more inreturn for its aid. Mr. Washburne wasunsparing in denunciation of the bill, andespecially of the famous section 10, whichsubordinated the government loan to the lienof the mortgage bonds. He denounced thischange as the most monstrous and flagrantattempt to overreach the government and thepeople that can be found in all the legislative annals of the country. He questioned thatthere had been compliance with the provisionof the charter limiting the stock held by oneperson to two hundred shares, or that someof the direc

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Image from page 160 of “Nature neighbors, embracing birds, plants, animals, minerals, in natural colors by color photography, containing articles by Gerald Alan Abbott, Dr. Albert Schneider, William Kerr Higley…and other eminent naturalists. Ed. by Nath
Chicago
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Identifier: natureneighborse03bant
Title: www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/book…
Year: 1914 (1910s)
Authors: Banta, Nathaniel Moore, 1867- Schneider, Albert, 1863- Higley, William Kerr, 1860-1908 Abbott, Gerard Alan
Subjects: Natural history
Publisher: Chicago, American Audobon association

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ould never have been suspected. THE WATER-THRUSH* The Water-thrush has so manj^ popular names that itwill be recognized by most observers by one or more ofthem. It is called small-billed water-thrush, water wagtail,water kick-up, Besoy kick-up, and river pink (Jamaica),aquatic accentor, and New York aquatic thrush. It isfound chiefly east of the Mississippi River, north to theArctic Coast, breeding from the north border of the UnitedStates northward. It winters in more southern UnitedStates, all of middle America, northern South America, andall of West Indies. It is accidental in Greenland. In Illi-nois this species is known as a migrant, passing slowlythrough in spring and fall, though in the extreme southernportion a few pass the winter, especially if the season bemild. It frequents swampy woods and open, wet places,nesting on the ground or in the roots of overturned trees atthe borders of swamps. Mr. M. K. Barnum, of Syracuse,New York, found a nest of this species in the roots of a

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Image from page 150 of “Nature neighbors, embracing birds, plants, animals, minerals, in natural colors by color photography, containing articles by Gerald Alan Abbott, Dr. Albert Schneider, William Kerr Higley…and other eminent naturalists. Ed. by Nath
Chicago
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Identifier: natureneighborse51914bant
Title: www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/book…
Year: 1914 (1910s)
Authors: Banta, Nathaniel Moore, 1867- Schneider, Albert, 1863- Higley, William Kerr, 1860-1908 Abbott, Gerard Alan
Subjects: Natural history
Publisher: Chicago, American Audobon association

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ected. THE WATER-THRUSH* The Water-thrush has so many popular names that itwill be recognized by most observers by one or more ofthem. It is called small-billed water-thrush, water wagtail,water kick-up, Besoy kick-up, and river pink (Jamaica),aquatic accentor, and New York aquatic thrush. It isfound chiefly east of the Mississippi River, north to theArctic Coast, breeding from the north border of the UnitedStates northward. It winters in more southern UnitedStates, all of middle America, northern South America, andall of West Indies. It is accidental in Greenland. In Illi-nois this species is known as a migrant, passing slowlythrough in spring and fall, though in the extreme southernportion a few pass the winter, especially if the season bemild. It frequents swampy woods and open, wet places,nesting on the ground or in the roots of overturned trees atthe borders of swamps. Mr. M. K. Barnum, of Syracuse,New York, found a nest of this species in the roots of a f-rt^^^^v:<^ J!3I^I00^

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Image from page 118 of “North Park College catalog” (1892)
Chicago
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Identifier: northparkcollege19141920nort
Title: North Park College catalog
Year: 1892 (1890s)
Authors: North Park College and Theological Seminary
Subjects: North Park College and Theological Seminary
Publisher: Chicago, Ill. : [s.n.]

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Officials, Private Secretaries, Sales Correspondents,and Teaming Contractors. Together 17. Our alumni, it seems, are to be found in three continents, America,Asia, and Europe. As to their distribution over the United States Mr.Ost gives the somewhat astonishing report that almost half of theirnumber, or 278, live in Illinois. Other States especially favored areMinnesota, with 52, Michigan, with 35, Nebraska, with 32, Iowa, with31, California, with 15, Washington, with 12, and New York, with 9.Two states, Massachusetts and Pennsylvania, can boast 7. ConnecticutThe Alumni nas ^ anc^ a ^e num^er is claimed by Canada and AlaskaWorld and China. Kansas has 5, and as many live in Sweden. Other States in the Union, claiming from 1 to 4, are: Indiana, Arizona,Montana, Oregon, South Dakota, Colorado, Missouri, Texas, Idaho, NewHampshire, North Caroline, Ohio, and Wyoming, in all 26 States. Meas-ured by the boundaries of our alumni habitation, the constituency ofNorth Park College is the World.

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ijjoToj fy JRtindstocfe Q feu) oft§e pretty scenes in Ijort!) fiir^near tfje college. 28 NORTH IAHK COLLEGE. C h apte r T iv o. (&tnm\ information. 1. LOCATION. North Park College is located in the beautiful suburb ofNorth Park within the northwestern Limits of Chicago, 111.It is most conveniently reached from the city by the Ravens-wood Branch of the Northwestern Elevated Railroad, whichhas its terminal four blocks south of the College. It may bereached also by surface lines, such as the Lawrence Avenueline, which runs within three blocks of the school, and theKedzie Avenue line, which has its terminal at the campus.The campus of the school contains eight and one-half acres,providing ample room for the buildings and a large ath-letic field. It is bounded on the south by the North Branchof the Chicago River. North Park College is thus situatedin pleasant natural surroundings and has convenient com-munications with the city of Chicago. 2. AIM. The object of the school is five-fold

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Image from page 372 of “North Dakota history and people; outlines of American history” (1917)
Chicago
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Identifier: northdakotahisto01loun
Title: North Dakota history and people; outlines of American history
Year: 1917 (1910s)
Authors: Lounsberry, Clement A. (Clement Augustus), 1843-1926
Subjects: North Dakota — History North Dakota — Biography
Publisher: Chicago, The S.J. Clarke Pub. co.

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an office. It was known that he intended to join the malcontentsat the Pine Ridge Agency and that he had been invited to come there for Godwas about to appear. He had asked permission to go but had prepared to gowithout permission. So on September 14, 1890, it was determined to make thearrest without further delay. There were some forty Indian police available andtwo companies of military, by forced marching from Fort Yates, were placed insupporting distance. Sitting Bulls arrest was made withovit resistance, but the police were imme-diately surrounded by one hundred and fifty or more of his friends on whomTie called to rescue him. Whereupon they rushed upon the police and engaged ina hand-to-hand battle. One of Sitting Bulls followers shot Lieut. Bull Head,the officer in command of the Indian police, in the side. Bull Head turned andshot Sitting Bull, who was also shot at the same time by Sergt. Red Tomahawk.Sergt. Shave Head was also shot. Catch the Bear, of Sitting Bulls party, who

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FOUETEEN FOOT LIGNITE SEAM ON LITTLE MISSOURI RIVER, NORTH-WESTERN DAKOTA X HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 251 fired the first shot, was killed by Alone Man, one of the Indian police. Therewere eight of Sitting Bulls party killed, including his seventeen-year-old son.The Indian pohce lost six killed or mortally wounded. Most of Sitting Bullsfollowers joined the Indians in the Bad Lands. Two weeks later, under the humane and fearless work of the military officers,most of the Indians who fled to the Band Lands on the approach of the militaryhad been induced to return to their agencies. Big Foots band and a few of Sitting Bulls Indians only remained in thefield. Big Foot had agreed to surrender. He was ill with pneumonia, and thearmy physician had made him comfortable in his tepee. The pipe of peace hungon the center pole of his lodge. A white flag floated from the middle of his campin token of his surrender. The women and children stood about the doors ofthe tepees, watching the soldiers in th

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Image from page 806 of “The street railway review” (1891)
Chicago
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Identifier: streetrailwayrev14amer
Title: The street railway review
Year: 1891 (1890s)
Authors: American Street Railway Association Street Railway Accountants’ Association of America American Railway, Mechanical, and Electrical Association
Subjects: Street-railroads
Publisher: Chicago : Street Railway Review Pub. Co

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inthe last few years. They are the Inventions of Mr. John A. Brill,vice-president of (he J. G. Brill Co. f.TH Yi:ak. N.I. 4—Ot-T. 14. 1904.1 I».\ir,Y STREKT IJAILW.W i;i;\ IKW. 787 These cars are equipped with Brill anglc^iron bumpers, radialdraw-bars, ratchet brake bandies. Dedenda gongs, conductorsgongs, foldins gates, round-corner seat-end panels, tradj scrapersand Dumpit sand boxes. All the trucks shown have side frames solid forged in a singlepiece—a method o( construction peculiar to the J. G. Brill Co. COMPLETED TUNNEL UNDER THE HUDSON RIVER. The first of the projected tunnels under the Hudson Kiver.connecting New York Cit.v with the New Jersey river front, is nowcompleted. The new tunnel rvins from 15th St.. Hobokefa. to apoint near Christopher St., Manhattan, and it will be used ulti-mately for bringing the electric cars of the Public Service Cor-poration into direit connection with the cars of the Metropolitansystem in New York. It is the intention to extend the tunnel

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TLN.NEI, UNDER HLIJSO.V RIVER. north on the Manhattan side to a point near 33rd St. and SixthAve., where connection will also be made with the New YorkSubway, and with the tunnel of the Pennsylvania R. R. The importance of this new tunnel under the Hudson River canhardly be overestimated. Within a radius of 25 miles from theJersey terminal there is a resident population of more than amillion and a half nf iicnidp to all of whom New York is the busl-

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Image from page 806 of “The street railway review” (1891)
Chicago
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Identifier: streetrailwayrev14amer
Title: The street railway review
Year: 1891 (1890s)
Authors: American Street Railway Association Street Railway Accountants’ Association of America American Railway, Mechanical, and Electrical Association
Subjects: Street-railroads
Publisher: Chicago : Street Railway Review Pub. Co

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TLN.NEI, UNDER HLIJSO.V RIVER. north on the Manhattan side to a point near 33rd St. and SixthAve., where connection will also be made with the New YorkSubway, and with the tunnel of the Pennsylvania R. R. The importance of this new tunnel under the Hudson River canhardly be overestimated. Within a radius of 25 miles from theJersey terminal there is a resident population of more than amillion and a half nf iicnidp to all of whom New York is the busl-

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KA«T HIDE Of TWI> LUCK l.> >UHTI1 TUNSKL. nnw and Rocial Mecca. More than 300,000 people crosH th<r Hud-Mon Riv»T dally In ferry boats. The new tunnel will permitthroUKh electric, railway Hervlce from Newark. Montilair. theOranKeii. Hackenfuu-k. Knglewood, Iatemon, Passaic. Hayonne.Jersey Cily and Holioken. directly Into Manhattan withoutchaoKe of cars, ll Is bellevrMi the cflrrylnR capacity of this newmeans of communication will lie taxed to ils utmost from the clayday It Is op. ned for reRular lraffl<-. The tunnel just completed is one of two that are beiui; built bythe New York & New Jersey Railroad Co., for the purpose ofcreating physical connections between the network of electricrailway lines in New Jersey, and the surface and subway lines ofManhattan. The tunnel now completed is the northerly one. Thesouth tunnel parallels this a short distance to the south. About2.000 ft. of the south tunnel is now completed and work is pro-gressing at the rate of 42 ft. p

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Image from page 482 of “An illustrated history of the State of Iowa : being a complete civil, political, and military history of the state, from its first exploration down to 1875; including a cyclopaedia of legislation during the administration of each o
Chicago
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Identifier: illustratedhisto1876tutt
Title: An illustrated history of the State of Iowa : being a complete civil, political, and military history of the state, from its first exploration down to 1875; including a cyclopaedia of legislation during the administration of each of the governors, from Lucas (1836) to Carpenter; with historical and descriptive sketches of each county in the state separately, embracing interesting narratives of pioneer life, including an account of the commercial, agricultural and educational growth of Iowa
Year: 1876 (1870s)
Authors: Tuttle, Charles R. (Charles Richard), b. 1848 Durrie, Daniel S. (Daniel Steele), 1819-1892
Subjects: Mormons
Publisher: Chicago : Richard S. Peale & Company

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grazing farmsof which it is the location. The areaof the county is 315,290 acres. TheDes Moines river waters its northeastcorner, and by its tributaries, SoapLick, Salt creek and Chequest creeks,it drains and renders fruitful a veryextensive range. Fox river, North andSouth Wyacondah and the Sabinsflow through the county on their wayto the Mississippi, affording a plenti-ful water supply and good drainage,and along the several streams, belts andgroves of good timber are very con-veniently located. Smooth prairieswith just enough of rise and fall tosecure adequate drainage constitutethe divides. The records of the county agricul-tural society show the remarkable factthat a premium was awarded duringthe second annual fair for the produc-tion of 138 bushels of corn from a-sin-gle acre. In the following year thepremium for production was awardedfor 213 bushels from one acre, andwheat has been raised to the extent offorty bushels from one acre, the aver-age being nearly twenty. Farming is

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480 Tuttles History of Iowa. well carried out in Davis county, andthe Keokuk and Des Moines railroadcarries to good markets the surplusproductions of the fertile and wellused land. There is no county inIowa which excels Davis for grazingand stock raising. Blue grass is asafe crop every time, but hay, timothyand clover are mainly relied on.Stock runs at large on many of theprairies and the wild grasses fatten aswell as feed them, while there is nodifficulty in their procuring as muchgood water as they desire. Splendidherds enrich the county in many ofits sections, and add much to thebeauty of the quiet scene. Fruits of all kinds that can be pro-duced in temperate climates will growin Davis county, and large quantitieshave actually been shipped. There aremany vineyards in good bearing inthis county, and many varieties flour-ish exceedingly well. The Osage or-ange hedge which comes to a sufficientgrowth in this county in five years,has attracted the attention of the farm-ing community, t

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Image from page 728 of “Engineering and Contracting” (1909)
Chicago
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Identifier: engineeringcontr41chicuoft
Title: Engineering and Contracting
Year: 1909 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects:
Publisher: Chicago

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ing building, hump yard, custom house, in-spection sheds, wheel pit, signal towers, yardelectrification, team tracks, etc. With thiswork completed the company now has at thispoint one of the most complete and fullyequipped plants, for the handling of freightand passengers to be found in this country.In this issue we shall treat, principally, of thelayout and architectural features of this im-provement, and in a succeeding issue shallcover the structural features of the work. and with the cross-overs in the train shed inuse about 30 minutes can be saved in makingup the trains and getting them across theriver, from that required to operate to andfrom the Third St. Station. The general scheme is that of a throughstation layout with 10 passenger tracks and 1express track under the cover of the trainshed. There are 7 through freight tracks inthe open south of the train shed and parallelto it at the same elevation. All of the tracks

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Fig. 1. Layout of Passenger Terminal of Michigan Central R. R. at Detroit, Mich. Mich., this improvement being the last stepin the extensive plan worked out by this com-pany. The entire project includes the tunnelsunder the Detroit River, the train sheds,yards and equipment, grade separation andbridges, coach yards, service building, warm- CENKRAL FEATLKES. To avoid the shuttle movement of all trainswhich was necessary when entering and leav-ing the old station the new terminal was lo-cated on the main line about % mile north-west of the tunnel portal. With this location are suiiported on a steel substructure for adistance of about 040 ft., the usable spaceunder the right-of-way being occupied by theInited States mail service and by baggageand express companies, etc. (see Fig. 1).In designing each part of the terminal pro- June 24. l»14. Engineering and Contracting 13 vision has been made for a considerable in-crease in traffic above that now required bythe Michigan Central, in order

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Image from page 224 of “The New York Tribune’s history of the United States, from the discovery of America until the present time, with a pocket atlas of the world, containing colored maps of each state and territory in the United States, with statistics
Chicago
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Identifier: newyorktribunesh00hass
Title: The New York Tribune’s history of the United States, from the discovery of America until the present time, with a pocket atlas of the world, containing colored maps of each state and territory in the United States, with statistics showing products and resources of the various states; also, maps of every country in the world
Year: 1887 (1880s)
Authors: Hassard, John R. G. (John Rose Greene), 1836-1888
Subjects: Atlases
Publisher: Chicago, Rand, McNally

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t average value of ; oxen and other cattle,January, 1884, 520,000, valued at ,840,000. Stringent laws to protect from encroachments by whites. Theycan hold land only by marrying into one of the tribes. Recentofllcial reports give Indian population about 80,000: Cherokees,20.000; Choctaws, 16,500; Creeks, 14,500; Chickasaws, 7,000; Semi-noles, 2,500; Osages, 2,390; Cheyennes, 3,298; Arapahoes, 2,676;Kiowas, 1,120; Pawnees, 1,438: Comanches, 1,475. No Territorial government has as yet been organized, owing todifferences in the views of Congress and the tribes. For eachagency, a deputy is appointed by the President to represent theunited States, but each tribe manages its own internal affairs.Mostof tlie tribes governed by chiefs. Of first five tribes, 83,6.50 can read, and have 16,200 houses, 196Bchools, and 8,250 pupils. Expended from tribal funds for educa-tional purposes, 6,856; from government appropriation forfreedmen, ,500. ATLAS OF THE WORLD. 151 MAP OF INDIAN TERRITORY.

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16» ATLAS OF THE WOULD. COLORADO. Kol-o-rahdo. •♦ Centennial State. Part of Louisiana purchase of 1803. First explored by VaequtaCoronado under the Spanish, 1540. First expedition sent out byUnited States Government, under Major Pike, 1806; a second undercommand of Col. S. H. Long, 18-20, and in 1842-44, Gen. John C.Fremont made his celebrated trip across the Rocky Mountains.First settlements made by miners, 1858-9; formed from parts ofKansas, Nebraska, Utah and New Mexico ; organized as a Ter-ritory, February, 1861; admitted August 1,1876. Area, 103,925 square miles ; lengm, 380 miles ; breadth, 280miles ; principal rivers. North and South Platte, Arkansas, Snake,White and Green. Number counties, 40. Temperature at Denver:winter, 25° to 37° ; summer. 72° to 74°. Rainfall of the Stale from15 to 20 inches, falling mostly between May and Julv. Five United States laud districts, with offices at Oenver, Pueblo,Falrplay, Lake City and Central City. Denver, capital and metrop-olis,

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