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Latest Chicago Near North Side News

Image from page 192 of “Chicago” (1917)
Chicago Near North Side
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Identifier: chicago00chatrich
Title: Chicago
Year: 1917 (1910s)
Authors: Chatfield-Taylor, H. C. (Hobart Chatfield), 1865-1945 Hornby, Lester George, b. 1882, ill
Subjects: Chicago (Ill.) — Description and travel Chicago (Ill.) — History
Publisher: Boston New York : Houghton Mifflin Co.
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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or, marveling at the sightof Chicago by night. Around me dimanchor-lights were glimmering over thewater; while the steam of locomotives,curling upward in fantastic clouds, veiledthe huge buildings before me in alluringmystery. Far above the glare of MichiganAvenue, their roofs and pinnacles were 86 The South Side outlined against the citys radiance. Somewere in darkness, others rimmed withlight; here and there an electric signflashed its brilliant hues; into the wavesbeyond reached the Municipal Pier, itsgraceful towers and slender form ablazewith innumerable lamps. Under the spell of the scene I pictureda little garrison retreating in despair alonga desert shore barely a century ago; thentried to realize that yonder broad stretchof parkland had been made before myeyes, and that I had seen one row ofbuildings on this water front destroyedby fire, and still another demolished tomake way for these mighty structureslooming in the night. Where the Lake Shore Drive begins V. The North Side

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-r.—^ VTHE NORTH SIDE CHICAGO appeared raw and bare toMiss Harriet Martiheau when shevisited it exactly eighty years ago: yet sheconfessed that she had never seen a busierplace. It was enjoying at the time a boomin land values which a panic was soon todispel, and storekeepers hailed her, as shepassed their doors, with ofFers of farms andbuilding-sites. The streets, moreover, werefilled with speculators who crowded abouta scarlet-coated negro on a white horsewhenever he waved a red flag and shoutedthe time and place of the next sale of lotsalong the proposed course of the Illinoisand Michigan Canal. Though the city numbered less thanfive thousand inhabitants then, the Eng-lish authoress acknowledges that there was 91 Chicago some allowable pride in the place aboutits society, her astonishment at havingfound an assemblage of educated, re-fined, and wealthy persons living on theedge of a wild prairie being shared, Iventure to say, by many an Eastern vis-itor to the Chicago of the prese

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Image from page 50 of “The North and West illustrated for tourist, business and pleasure travel : The popular resorts of California, Nevada, Idaho, Montana, Utah, Wyoming, Colorado, Nebraska, Dakota, Iowa, Illinois, Wisconsin, northern Michigan and Minnes
Chicago Near North Side
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Identifier: northwestillustr1876chic
Title: The North and West illustrated for tourist, business and pleasure travel : The popular resorts of California, Nevada, Idaho, Montana, Utah, Wyoming, Colorado, Nebraska, Dakota, Iowa, Illinois, Wisconsin, northern Michigan and Minnesota. A guide to the lakes and rivers, to the plains and mountains, to the resorts of birds, game animals and fishes; and hints for the commercial traveler, the theatre manager, the land hunter and the emigrant
Year: 1876 (1870s)
Authors: Chicago and North Western Railway Company Stennett, W. H. (William H.), 1832-1915
Subjects:
Publisher: Chicago, Ill. : Chicago & North-Western Railway Co.

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on the higherbluffs. The poor farmand almshouse of Clin-ton county adjoin the vil- -=lage. The village has one ^f^school, three churches,two flour mills, and onehotel, The Sherman House, Stephenson Countythat can accommodate fifty guests. Goose Lake, 3 port» •* miles southeast, is a great resort for sportsmen;geese, ducks and brant being very abundant. Deepriver (well named, as it is over 15 feet deep) hasrecently been, by the State Fish Commissioner,stocked with young California salmon. Along theriver, Indian mounds and the remains of ancientmining operations are found. Delmar, 171 miles from Chicago, is at the junc-tion of the Davenport & St. Paul R. R, and hasabout 600 inhabitants, one school, one church,(Methodist), a public hall and library, one news-paper, and two hotels—The Junction, and TheRiggs. Maquoketa river is 4 miles, and large andvaluable stone quarries %% miles distant. Maquoketa, 176 miles from Chicago, is thecounty seat of Jackson county,which was organized

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in 1847, and now has 24,000 population. The cityhas 3,000 inhabitants, is built on both sides of theMaquoketa river, and on the edge of the largestbody of timber there is in the State of Iowa (hencethey call this the timber city.) Before the rail-road was built here, steamers ran from the Missis-sippi river to this point. The city is picturesquelylocated on high bluffs, and has fine, wide, wellpaved streets. Considerable manufacturing is car-ried on in the lines of furniture, agricultural imple-ments, and other articles, in which wood is largelyused. The city has one school house that cost,000, and several cheaper ones, six hotels, a finecounty court house, four flour mills, two woolenmills, a tannery, three banks, four churches, and alarge number of fine business houses. Two medici-nal springs within the city limits have large localrepute. Two miles off is an Indian burial ground.The business of this city for 1875 showed overthirty-three per cent, increase over 1874. Nashville, 18

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Image from page 495 of “History of Nebraska from the earliest explorations of the trans-Mississippi region” (1918)
Chicago
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Identifier: historyofnebrask00mort
Title: History of Nebraska from the earliest explorations of the trans-Mississippi region
Year: 1918 (1910s)
Authors: Morton, J. Sterling (Julius Sterling), 1832-1902 Watkins, Albert, 1848-1923 Thomas, Augustus Orloff, 1863-1935 Beattie, James A., 1845- Wakeley, Arthur Cooper, 1855-
Subjects: Nebraska — History
Publisher: Lincoln, Neb., Western Publishing and Engraving Company

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to the southern route was demoral-ized where it was not devastated by warthe other hand, the great natural I Matte riverroute was in direct line westward with the rial tier of states of which Chicago hadalready become the commercial entrepot, and at least four trunk lines of railway from thatgreat central point would naturally reach the 47. HISTORY OF NEBRASKA Missouri river north of the line between Iowaand Missouri and within reach of the in-fluence of the Platte route magnet. The actof 1864 provided that any company having aline reaching Sioux City from the east mightbuild the Sioux City & Pacific branch. Inorder to avail themselves of lands then morevaluable than those lying across the Missouri,the builders, John I. Blair and Oakes Ames,kept the road on the Iowa side to a point op-posite Blair, and then made the connection atFremont. This branch was never a part ofthe Union Pacific system, and in 1884 it fellinto the control of the Chicago & Northwes-tern railroad company.

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Thomas C. DurantChief promoter, Union Pacific railroad There was a bitter controversy in Congressover the passage of the amendatory act of1864, and the opposition in the House was ledby two eminent members, E. B. Washburneof Illinois, a republican, and William H. Hol-man of Indiana, a democrat. Mr. Holmandemanded that provision should be made forcarrying the property and troops of the UnitedStates free of charge, and he predicted thatthe government would get nothing more inreturn for its aid. Mr. Washburne wasunsparing in denunciation of the bill, andespecially of the famous section 10, whichsubordinated the government loan to the lienof the mortgage bonds. He denounced thischange as the most monstrous and flagrantattempt to overreach the government and thepeople that can be found in all the legislative annals of the country. He questioned thatthere had been compliance with the provisionof the charter limiting the stock held by oneperson to two hundred shares, or that someof the direc

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Catch of the Day
Chicago Near North Side
Image by National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Four women selling fish.

Thanks to those of you who pointed out that this is Spanish Parade on the Spanish Arch side of the Claddagh in Galway City. That’s Claddagh Quay and Nimmo’s Pier in the background.

According to colman.rushe this photo is mentioned in Peadar O’Dowd’s book Down by the Claddagh, so I went off and got our copy of Down by the Claddagh (1993), and there indeed is this photo with the caption underneath:
"Bringing the fish to market: As this postcard (printed in Berlin) states, four Irish Fish Wifes make their way up along Long Walk to the fish market in front of the Spanish Arch or An Póirse Caoch (the Blind Arch) as it was known then. (Courtesy Jimmy O’Connor)

Now, a bigger challenge would be to identify some of the women, and we have received very tentative information that these women may be Nonnie O’Donnell, Mary Rodgers, Kitty Conneely and a Mrs Gill, all from the Claddagh. Does that ring any bells?

Date: Circa 1905

NLI Ref.: Eas 4055

Latest Chicago Near North Side News

Pinkeens
Chicago Near North Side
Image by National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Two little guys with their father/grandfather at the pond in Herbert Park, Dublin. One has his net for catching pinkeens, but thought the other might have been controlling a model boat?

The Pergola and covered walkway just above the far side of the pond sadly fell victim to the Snowpocalypse of winter 2010/2011 and collapsed under the weight of snow and ice. That aside, if you visit Herbert Park today, this scene is completely unchanged.

Slow Loose Chippings told us that the "pond in Herbert Park was once the mill pond for the nearby Mill at Ballsbridge" and Niall McAuley provided us with a map showing that old mill pond.

P.S. "Going fishing" myself for a few days, but will be back in action at the end of the week…

Date: Summer 1969

NLI Ref.: WIL 66[3]

Latest Chicago River North News

Image from page 160 of “Nature neighbors, embracing birds, plants, animals, minerals, in natural colors by color photography, containing articles by Gerald Alan Abbott, Dr. Albert Schneider, William Kerr Higley…and other eminent naturalists. Ed. by Nath
Chicago
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Identifier: natureneighborse03bant
Title: www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/book…
Year: 1914 (1910s)
Authors: Banta, Nathaniel Moore, 1867- Schneider, Albert, 1863- Higley, William Kerr, 1860-1908 Abbott, Gerard Alan
Subjects: Natural history
Publisher: Chicago, American Audobon association

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ould never have been suspected. THE WATER-THRUSH* The Water-thrush has so manj^ popular names that itwill be recognized by most observers by one or more ofthem. It is called small-billed water-thrush, water wagtail,water kick-up, Besoy kick-up, and river pink (Jamaica),aquatic accentor, and New York aquatic thrush. It isfound chiefly east of the Mississippi River, north to theArctic Coast, breeding from the north border of the UnitedStates northward. It winters in more southern UnitedStates, all of middle America, northern South America, andall of West Indies. It is accidental in Greenland. In Illi-nois this species is known as a migrant, passing slowlythrough in spring and fall, though in the extreme southernportion a few pass the winter, especially if the season bemild. It frequents swampy woods and open, wet places,nesting on the ground or in the roots of overturned trees atthe borders of swamps. Mr. M. K. Barnum, of Syracuse,New York, found a nest of this species in the roots of a

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Image from page 150 of “Nature neighbors, embracing birds, plants, animals, minerals, in natural colors by color photography, containing articles by Gerald Alan Abbott, Dr. Albert Schneider, William Kerr Higley…and other eminent naturalists. Ed. by Nath
Chicago
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: natureneighborse51914bant
Title: www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/book…
Year: 1914 (1910s)
Authors: Banta, Nathaniel Moore, 1867- Schneider, Albert, 1863- Higley, William Kerr, 1860-1908 Abbott, Gerard Alan
Subjects: Natural history
Publisher: Chicago, American Audobon association

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ected. THE WATER-THRUSH* The Water-thrush has so many popular names that itwill be recognized by most observers by one or more ofthem. It is called small-billed water-thrush, water wagtail,water kick-up, Besoy kick-up, and river pink (Jamaica),aquatic accentor, and New York aquatic thrush. It isfound chiefly east of the Mississippi River, north to theArctic Coast, breeding from the north border of the UnitedStates northward. It winters in more southern UnitedStates, all of middle America, northern South America, andall of West Indies. It is accidental in Greenland. In Illi-nois this species is known as a migrant, passing slowlythrough in spring and fall, though in the extreme southernportion a few pass the winter, especially if the season bemild. It frequents swampy woods and open, wet places,nesting on the ground or in the roots of overturned trees atthe borders of swamps. Mr. M. K. Barnum, of Syracuse,New York, found a nest of this species in the roots of a f-rt^^^^v:<^ J!3I^I00^

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Image from page 118 of “North Park College catalog” (1892)
Chicago
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Identifier: northparkcollege19141920nort
Title: North Park College catalog
Year: 1892 (1890s)
Authors: North Park College and Theological Seminary
Subjects: North Park College and Theological Seminary
Publisher: Chicago, Ill. : [s.n.]

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Officials, Private Secretaries, Sales Correspondents,and Teaming Contractors. Together 17. Our alumni, it seems, are to be found in three continents, America,Asia, and Europe. As to their distribution over the United States Mr.Ost gives the somewhat astonishing report that almost half of theirnumber, or 278, live in Illinois. Other States especially favored areMinnesota, with 52, Michigan, with 35, Nebraska, with 32, Iowa, with31, California, with 15, Washington, with 12, and New York, with 9.Two states, Massachusetts and Pennsylvania, can boast 7. ConnecticutThe Alumni nas ^ anc^ a ^e num^er is claimed by Canada and AlaskaWorld and China. Kansas has 5, and as many live in Sweden. Other States in the Union, claiming from 1 to 4, are: Indiana, Arizona,Montana, Oregon, South Dakota, Colorado, Missouri, Texas, Idaho, NewHampshire, North Caroline, Ohio, and Wyoming, in all 26 States. Meas-ured by the boundaries of our alumni habitation, the constituency ofNorth Park College is the World.

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ijjoToj fy JRtindstocfe Q feu) oft§e pretty scenes in Ijort!) fiir^near tfje college. 28 NORTH IAHK COLLEGE. C h apte r T iv o. (&tnm\ information. 1. LOCATION. North Park College is located in the beautiful suburb ofNorth Park within the northwestern Limits of Chicago, 111.It is most conveniently reached from the city by the Ravens-wood Branch of the Northwestern Elevated Railroad, whichhas its terminal four blocks south of the College. It may bereached also by surface lines, such as the Lawrence Avenueline, which runs within three blocks of the school, and theKedzie Avenue line, which has its terminal at the campus.The campus of the school contains eight and one-half acres,providing ample room for the buildings and a large ath-letic field. It is bounded on the south by the North Branchof the Chicago River. North Park College is thus situatedin pleasant natural surroundings and has convenient com-munications with the city of Chicago. 2. AIM. The object of the school is five-fold

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Image from page 372 of “North Dakota history and people; outlines of American history” (1917)
Chicago
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Identifier: northdakotahisto01loun
Title: North Dakota history and people; outlines of American history
Year: 1917 (1910s)
Authors: Lounsberry, Clement A. (Clement Augustus), 1843-1926
Subjects: North Dakota — History North Dakota — Biography
Publisher: Chicago, The S.J. Clarke Pub. co.

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an office. It was known that he intended to join the malcontentsat the Pine Ridge Agency and that he had been invited to come there for Godwas about to appear. He had asked permission to go but had prepared to gowithout permission. So on September 14, 1890, it was determined to make thearrest without further delay. There were some forty Indian police available andtwo companies of military, by forced marching from Fort Yates, were placed insupporting distance. Sitting Bulls arrest was made withovit resistance, but the police were imme-diately surrounded by one hundred and fifty or more of his friends on whomTie called to rescue him. Whereupon they rushed upon the police and engaged ina hand-to-hand battle. One of Sitting Bulls followers shot Lieut. Bull Head,the officer in command of the Indian police, in the side. Bull Head turned andshot Sitting Bull, who was also shot at the same time by Sergt. Red Tomahawk.Sergt. Shave Head was also shot. Catch the Bear, of Sitting Bulls party, who

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FOUETEEN FOOT LIGNITE SEAM ON LITTLE MISSOURI RIVER, NORTH-WESTERN DAKOTA X HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 251 fired the first shot, was killed by Alone Man, one of the Indian police. Therewere eight of Sitting Bulls party killed, including his seventeen-year-old son.The Indian pohce lost six killed or mortally wounded. Most of Sitting Bullsfollowers joined the Indians in the Bad Lands. Two weeks later, under the humane and fearless work of the military officers,most of the Indians who fled to the Band Lands on the approach of the militaryhad been induced to return to their agencies. Big Foots band and a few of Sitting Bulls Indians only remained in thefield. Big Foot had agreed to surrender. He was ill with pneumonia, and thearmy physician had made him comfortable in his tepee. The pipe of peace hungon the center pole of his lodge. A white flag floated from the middle of his campin token of his surrender. The women and children stood about the doors ofthe tepees, watching the soldiers in th

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Latest Chicago Near North Side News

Image from page 40 of “The North and West illustrated for tourist, business and pleasure travel : The popular resorts of California, Nevada, Idaho, Montana, Utah, Wyoming, Colorado, Nebraska, Dakota, Iowa, Illinois, Wisconsin, northern Michigan and Minnes
Chicago Near North Side
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: northwestillustr1876chic
Title: The North and West illustrated for tourist, business and pleasure travel : The popular resorts of California, Nevada, Idaho, Montana, Utah, Wyoming, Colorado, Nebraska, Dakota, Iowa, Illinois, Wisconsin, northern Michigan and Minnesota. A guide to the lakes and rivers, to the plains and mountains, to the resorts of birds, game animals and fishes; and hints for the commercial traveler, the theatre manager, the land hunter and the emigrant
Year: 1876 (1870s)
Authors: Chicago and North Western Railway Company Stennett, W. H. (William H.), 1832-1915
Subjects:
Publisher: Chicago, Ill. : Chicago & North-Western Railway Co.

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e: The Ogden, (recentlyrebuilt), having 125 rooms;Pacific, 75 rooms; Metropol-itan, 25 rooms; Bryant, 20rooms; Clifton, 25 rooms;and Farmers, 20 rooms;charges range from .50 toS3 per day. Since the bridgeacross the river here wasbuilt, an effort has beenmade by the people ofCouncil Bluffs to have thetrains of the Union PacificRoad cross the bridge, andmake Council Bluffs theeastern terminus of thatline, but owing to variouscomplications their termi-nus was held at Omaha, onthe opposite side of theriver, and the trains of theIowa lines made CouncilBluffs their western termi-nus. The result was adouble transfer, the passen-gers from the trains fromthe East debarking here,getting into a transfertrain that crossed thebridge, and again debarkingon the Omaha side, andthere taking the westbound trains of the UnionPacific Road. Coming fromthe West similar transferswere made. A recent decis-ion of the Supreme Courtof the United States seemsto have settled the ques-tion, and very soon a joint

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32 The North and West Illustrated. depot is promised for the east bank of the river,and the usual double transfer will be avoided. AtCouncil Bluffs we makeclose connections withthe trains of The Kansas City, St. Joseph & Council, Bluffs Railroad, which are taken byour passengers for St. Joseph, Atchison, Leaven-worth, Kansas City, and other Western Missouriand Kansas towns. Omaha. Hurriedly we have spanned the 492 miles that separate Chicago from Omaha, andcrossing the beautiful railroad bridge (a view of which we give,) you are landed inthat live, wide-awake city, whose name is Omaha. There you will find the GrandCentral Hotel, with our ticket offices therein, many fine business houses, built alongfinely graded and paved streets, that are constantly crowded with the evidences of alarge and rapidly growing trade. Besides the Grand Central, the city contains severalother good hotels, an opera house, fine school houses, churches, public halls, largemanufacturing establishments, the

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