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Latest Chicago Loop News

Image from page 90 of “Chicago” (1917)
Chicago Loop
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Identifier: chicago00chatrich
Title: Chicago
Year: 1917 (1910s)
Authors: Chatfield-Taylor, H. C. (Hobart Chatfield), 1865-1945 Hornby, Lester George, b. 1882, ill
Subjects: Chicago (Ill.) — Description and travel Chicago (Ill.) — History
Publisher: Boston New York : Houghton Mifflin Co.
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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ol; yet seldom would it thrill 29 Chicago to architectural beauty, and then onlybecause an occasional architect had dis-covered that a sky-scraper need not ofnecessity be either entirely shoddy or en-tirely ugly. There is, for example, an aca-demic appropriateness in the utilitarianGothic of the new University Club, anda feeling of architectural correctness inthe graceful Renaissance bank building atthe northeast corner of Monroe and ClarkStreets; for here, at least, there is pleasingimposture, its base giving the appearanceof sufficient strength to bear its weight. Occasionally, too, a note of original-ity is sounded, as in the case of the CityClub; but, generally speaking, the Loop isbarren of architectural charm. Its gran-deur is inspiring, I confess, like that otlower New York; but a lover of the beau-tiful will search it almost in vain, as he willthe business district of any American city,for that which delights, rather than thrills, 30 The Market in South Water Street ^^-^-n. ^^

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Image from page 185 of “Chicago, a history and forecast” (1921)
Chicago Loop
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Identifier: chicagohistoryfor00harp
Title: Chicago, a history and forecast
Year: 1921 (1920s)
Authors: Harper, William Hudson, 1857- ed Chicago Association of Commerce and Industry Quaife, Milo Milton, 1880-1959 McIlvaine, Mabel
Subjects: Chicago (Ill.) — Description and travel Chicago (Ill.) — History
Publisher: [Chicago] The Chicago association of commerce

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g stations oryards located on less valuable property and equippedfor sorting and schedule loading of L. C. L. freight.Indeed, the commission would apply the co-operativeprinciple by establishing in centers of traffic some uni-versal freight receiving stations for outbound L. C. L.freight. This would reduce unnecessary teaming andstreet congestion. The commission favors considerationof the two or more level plan in the future developmentof freight facilities in congested areas. Forthcoming electrification would be greatly reducedby simplifying and unifying the passenger tracks enter-ing the city; by removing the present tangle of lines;by establishment of direct instead of roundabout routes 181 within the city; and by the joint use of tracks availablefor and adequate for more railway companies than thosewhich now utilize these particular tracks. The adoptionof outlying co-operative freight stations would greatlysimplify the electrification of more central freight ter-minals and tracks.

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o bC IB 3o C/3 182 Since its creation the Railway Terminal Commissionhas acted in an advisory capacity to the city council onall matters pertaining to railway terminals. In this wayit has been enabled to direct all actions of the councilin matters pertaining to them. After the passage of the West Side union station ordi-nance, the two problems of greatest importance as affect-ing the terminal situation in the central business districtwere: first, the development of an adequate passengerterminal station on the property of the Illinois CentralRailroad on the lake front and Roosevelt Road; second,the straightening of the Chicago River and the rearrange-ment and consolidation of railroad terminal facilities inthe territory south of the Loop district between StateStreet and the Chicago River. The passage by the city council July 21, 1919, ofthe so-called Illinois Central-lake front ordinance wasthe culmination of several years intensive work on thepart of the commission and was considered

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Latest Chicago Loop News

Image from page 108 of “Chicago” (1917)
Chicago Loop
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Identifier: chicago00chatrich
Title: Chicago
Year: 1917 (1910s)
Authors: Chatfield-Taylor, H. C. (Hobart Chatfield), 1865-1945 Hornby, Lester George, b. 1882, ill
Subjects: Chicago (Ill.) — Description and travel Chicago (Ill.) — History
Publisher: Boston New York : Houghton Mifflin Co.

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are rich in historic memory, thenames Briggs, Revere, and Clifton stillremaining, like that of Sherman, to recall 39 Chicago the days when the treasonable murmuringsof our Copperheads were so completelystifled by the Lumbardsstirring singing ofthe songs of George F. Root, that our fullquota of troops was dispatched to thefront. Although the Palmer House and theGrand Pacific were barely under roofwhen the Great Fire swept them away, thehotels which now bear these names areamong the oldest buildings in the Loop,typifying to my generation the after-the-Fire period, when we were bending our en-ergies to the re-creation of our city. Ourhomes were then in tree-lined avenues—Dearborn, LaSalle, Michigan, Prairie, andCalumet — and one or the other of thesepalatial hotels, as we were wont to callthem, was the Mecca of our social pilgrim-ages downtown. Will any old Chica-goan ever forget the annual game dinnerat the Grand Pacific, when in best bib and 40 LaSalle Street at the Stock Exchange

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b \ • < The Heart of the City tucker we partook of such obsolete viandsas antelope steak and roast buffalo broughtto us by grinning darkies, each balancingupon an upturned palm a tray filled withdishes shaped like canary birds bathtubs?The Palmer House, the Grand Pacific,and also the new Tremont House werethen our pride, and their bonifaces amongour most esteemed citizens; for who didnot cherish a nod of recognition fromPotter Palmer, John B. Drake, or John A.Rice? Their marble-floored lobbies wereour accustomed haunts, — except at con-vention time, when the slouch-hattedhenchmen of Grant, Blaine, Logan, orGarfield usurped our easy chairs and sul-lied our favorite corners with their tobaccojuice. The sky-scraping hotels of to-daywith their maitres d hotel, gar cons de res-taurmit, and cuisines francaises, are not ofour Chicago soil as were those hostelriesof the after-the-Fire period; nor do they 41 Chicago play so notable a part in the life of thecity. Indeed, the Palmer House

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Latest Chicago Loop News

Image from page 78 of “Chicago” (1917)
Chicago Loop
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Identifier: chicago00chatrich
Title: Chicago
Year: 1917 (1910s)
Authors: Chatfield-Taylor, H. C. (Hobart Chatfield), 1865-1945 Hornby, Lester George, b. 1882, ill
Subjects: Chicago (Ill.) — Description and travel Chicago (Ill.) — History
Publisher: Boston New York : Houghton Mifflin Co.

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lion people of 25 Chicago both sexes are dumped six days a week bythe transportation lines to toil for theirdaily bread. When the office buildings andstores vomit them into the streets at night-fall, they hang to straps in surface,steam, orelevated cars, until they reach the housesand flats they designate as home ; but nosooner is the soot washed from their facesthan a goodly proportion ot them hastenback to the Loop again, for here are theclubs, theatres, restaurants, and hotels, aswell as the banks, offices, and departmentstores. Indeed, when the street lamps andprotean signs begin to glisten, the aspectof the Loop alters entirely. Restless menand neurotic women no longer scamperfrom sky-scraper to sky-scraper; in theirplaces are affable strollers who tarry nowand then to gaze at the modish manikinsdisplayed in the gay shop windows. Thestreet cars still deposit people in the Loop,but they are merry-makers, not toilers, 26 From the Viaduct — The Loop Station at West Randolph Street

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The Heart of the City and some of them actually find time tosmile. The horse truck, moreover, and themotor van have disappeared, and only thelimousine and taxicab remain to menacelife. A cauldron of human endeavor by day,a pleasure spot by night, the Loop is lit-erally, as well as metaphorically, the heartof the city. Technically speaking it is thepart of our so-called Business Districtencircled by the ugly posts and girders ofthe elevated railways. In reality, however,it extends to the lake and river, and as farsouth as the Blackstone Hotel; for withinthis area of less than a square mile is foundeverything material or aesthetic which theinhabitants of our three sides enjoy incommon. Less than fifty years ago this Loop wasa waste of smouldering ruins; yet thebuilder of the sky-scraper has been almostas ruthless a destroyer as the Great Fire 27 Chicago itself, so different in aspect is the businessdistrict of to-day from that which arosefromthe ashes of i 87 i. Should some Rip VanWinkl

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Latest Chicago Loop News

Image from page 90 of “Chicago” (1917)
Chicago Loop
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Identifier: chicago00chatrich
Title: Chicago
Year: 1917 (1910s)
Authors: Chatfield-Taylor, H. C. (Hobart Chatfield), 1865-1945 Hornby, Lester George, b. 1882, ill
Subjects: Chicago (Ill.) — Description and travel Chicago (Ill.) — History
Publisher: Boston New York : Houghton Mifflin Co.

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>^.. The Heart of the City the eye. Blame not the architects whosetask is to get the most rent per cubic footwith the least possible outlay, but ratherthe avaricious owners of real estate, andthe supine aldermen whose baneful or-dinances have permitted our cities to bedistorted out of all architectural propor-tion. Chicago, however, was the first of-fender, the sky-scraper being its offspring.Alas, if only some Baron Haussmann hadhad the power to stifle it at the momentof its birth, American cities might to-daybe beautiful. Yet in no other way, it seems to me, arethe ideals and characteristics of a peopleat the different periods of its existence sodefinitely expressed as by its architecture,— particularly that which is ecclesiasticalor governmental; and nowhere, 1 believe,is the truth of this so clearly demonstratedas by the different court-houses and cityhalls which have stood from time to time 31 Chicago within the part of the Loop which in thecitys infancy was known as the Pub

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Latest Chicago Loop News

Image from page 38 of “Chicago” (1917)
Chicago Loop
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Identifier: chicago00chatrich
Title: Chicago
Year: 1917 (1910s)
Authors: Chatfield-Taylor, H. C. (Hobart Chatfield), 1865-1945 Hornby, Lester George, b. 1882, ill
Subjects: Chicago (Ill.) — Description and travel Chicago (Ill.) — History
Publisher: Boston New York : Houghton Mifflin Co.

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ng woman beside me. Iadore Chicago, she exclaimed. It is thepulse of America. 3 Chicago For fifteen years that tribute to mynative city has been ringing in my ears;— and now when my task, is to write ofits life, both new and old, those wordsof Sarah Bernhardt come impulsively tomind as the best with which to character-ize its individuality among the cities ofthe world. A little upstart village, an Englishtraveler called Chicago at the time whenthe building of the Illinois and MichiganCanal was begun. Barely a decade afterthe first boat had passed through its locks,our city contained a hundred thousand en-ergetic souls; and now, just eighty yearssince the first spadeful of earth was turnedfor the digging of that momentous ditch, ithouses well considerably two million men,women, and children foregathered frompractically every land on earth. The new-est great City of the newest great Coun-try, it is the held in which industrial wars 4 State Street from the Van Buren Loop Station •fMY

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The River of the Portage are fought and civic experiments tested— the crucible in which a most dispro-portionate mixture of native and alienmanhood is fused into American citizen-ship. May not this municipality which hasgrown from a little upstart village to ahuge upstart city within the ken of someborn within its limits, who are still in theland of the living, be termed, without un-due bravado, The pulse of America ? To the stranger within her gates themost forbidding part of Chicago is the re-gion of dilapidated buildings and ill-pavedstreets adjoining the Rush Street Bridge.Yet this rookery is the part of our city bestentitled to be qualified as old, for here isthe seat of a history vying in age withalmost any in the land. Here, too, is themain reach of the river whence sprang thecitys greatness and from which it takes itsname. Once it flowed turbid into the lake; now 5 Chicago it runs lucid, albeit artificially, to the Mis-sissippi. Yet to the casual beholder it hasever been unp

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Latest Chicago Loop News

Image from page 430 of “Diseases of the dog and their treatment” (1911)
Chicago Loop
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Identifier: diseasesofdogthe00ml
Title: Diseases of the dog and their treatment
Year: 1911 (1910s)
Authors: Müller, Georg Alfred, 1851-1923 Glass, Alexander
Subjects: Horses Dogs — Diseases
Publisher: Chicago, Ill. : Alexander Eger

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for instance the bladder, loops of intestine, or theomentum. Cadeac found in a unilateral inguinal rupture the size ofa childs head on the right side, the entire intestinal tract and on theleft side the omentum, the spleen, uterus and the bladder. An 390 HERNIAL RUPTURE inguinal hernia in the l)itch if it is of any size is easily recognized (Fig.128). It is found in the posterior part of the mammary gland, an enlarge-ment varying in size, elastic, painless, with no increase of the local tem-perature. When the animal is placed on her back, it either returns toits normal position by natural gravitation or else it is reduced with verylittle manipulation. On the return of the contents of the hernial sac theabdominal ring is found to be very much dilated above normal. Inrare instances it may be found impossible to reduce the hernia entirely,and this is found to be due to certain adhesions of the abdominal contentsto the pouch or else to a pregnant uterus; in the latter case the fcBtus can

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Fig. 128.—Inguinal hernia of bitch. easily be detected by manipulation. In certain cases where there is adoubt as to the exact nature of an enlargement in the position of inguinalhernia, if it is the uterus in the sac, on introducing the finger into thevagina, that is found to be elongated and deviated to one side, due tothe stretching and weight of the uterus, and it is also found that it isimpossible to reach the os uteri with the end of the finger. In very rarecases when the round ligament of the uterus (false inguinal hernia) isgreatly hypertrophied, it might be possible to mistake it for inguinalhernia. (False inguinal hernia.) As a rule inguinal hernia in the bitchis rarely involved in strangulation, and if s^hc should be in whelp, shehas her puppies without trouble. A bitch affected with inguinal hernia nuist be carefully fed, avoiding UMBILICAL HERNIA 391 food that is hard to digest, or has a tendency to cause flatulence or to con-stipate. If it becomes necessary to remove t

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Latest Chicago Loop News

Image from page 24 of “Chicago” (1917)
Chicago Loop
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Identifier: chicago00chatrich
Title: Chicago
Year: 1917 (1910s)
Authors: Chatfield-Taylor, H. C. (Hobart Chatfield), 1865-1945 Hornby, Lester George, b. 1882, ill
Subjects: Chicago (Ill.) — Description and travel Chicago (Ill.) — History
Publisher: Boston New York : Houghton Mifflin Co.

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Contents I. The River of the Portage II. The Heart of the City . III. The Great West Side IV, The South SideV. The North Side VI. The Soul of the City 23 47 6789 113 5032-14 Field Museum, Jackson Park

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■\-mi. Illustrations The Water Tower ….. i Rush Street at the Bridge {colored) Frontispiece Site of Old Fort Dearborn . . . v Field Museum, Jackson Park . . . vii The Cathedral, Washington Street . ix A River Warehouse . . , . i State Street from the Van Buren Loop Station …… 4 Chicago River from Rush Street Bridge 10 Site of the Fort Dearborn Massacre . 14 vii Illustrations The Canon of Quincy Street fromFifth Avenue . . . . .20 A Bit of Old Wabash Avenue . . 23 From the Viaduct — The Loop StationAT West Randolph Street . . .26 The Board of Trade Building fromLaSalle Street . . . . .28 The Market in South Water Street . 30 Michigan Avenue from Grant Park . 36 LaSalle Street at the Stock Exchange 40 Michigan Boulevard South from qth Street ….. In Old Washington Street The Old Marble-Fronts of Washing-ton Street ….. The Church at Union Park . Michigan Boulevard at the Art Insti-tute …… In the Stockyards …. The Douglas Monument The Library ….. Columbus Caravels of

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Image from page 290 of “Studies in reading; teacher’s manual” (1919)
Chicago Loop
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Identifier: studiesinreading00sear
Title: Studies in reading; teacher’s manual
Year: 1919 (1910s)
Authors: Searson, J. W. (James William), 1873-1927 Martin, George Ellsworth, 1872- joint author Tinley, Lucy Williams, joint author
Subjects: Reading (Elementary)
Publisher: Lincoln, Chicago The University publishing company

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Cut Christmas pictures from old catalogs and maga-zines. Make paper sleds by cutting the designs flat andfolding down the runners. Use yarn for rope. Draw and color the flag. Make a Lincoln booklet.Purchase tiny pictures of Lincoln for covers. Cut ordraw a log cabin. Make cuttings of soldiers. Makevalentines. Spring. Roll marbles from clay and dry them. Whenthey are hard, paint them with water colors and withshellac. The shellac will bring out the color, making themarbles shiny, and will also form a hard coat whichhelps to prevent their breaking. Now the children will need bags to hold the marbles.Cut from cotton cloth a piece about six inches by nineinches. Fold over and sew up the sides. Hem the topwith a wide hem and run a draw-string through. SEAT WORK 281

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To make kites, use construction paper about eightinches square, preferably light weight manila. Firstfold the paper on one diagonal line, then lay the oppositecorners on the diagonal line above the center so that theedges will lie on the diagonal fold. Cut eyes, nose, andmouth from black or colored cutting paper and pastethem on the front. Here is a legitimate use of the grotes-que, and the children will delight in making funnyfaces. Next fasten on the tail—a string about twelve incheslong. Tear strips of colored paper and tie them on the tail.With small children the easiest way is to tie a loop inthe string, slip in a scrap of paper and tighten the loop. Last of all, fasten the string to the back, tying thetwo loose corners together. Have the older boys showthe younger children other ways to make kites. 282 STUDIES IN READING

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Image from page 111 of “Chicago, a history and forecast” (1921)
Chicago Loop
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Identifier: chicagohistoryfor00harp
Title: Chicago, a history and forecast
Year: 1921 (1920s)
Authors: Harper, William Hudson, 1857- ed Chicago Association of Commerce and Industry Quaife, Milo Milton, 1880-1959 McIlvaine, Mabel
Subjects: Chicago (Ill.) — Description and travel Chicago (Ill.) — History
Publisher: [Chicago] The Chicago association of commerce

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and opened a year before the fire, and theparent school of the present Loyola college, being outof the path of the flames, was spared. Fifty years have passed and this is the significantgrowth of the Catholic church in Chicago as officially indicated by its authorities: 1921 1872 Catholic churches in Chicago 227 28 Diocesan priests 643 138 Priests of religious orders 350 31 Parochial schools 202 23 Pupils in parochial schools 130,000 10,000 High schools 22 …. Pupils in high schools 2,172 …. The above statistics measure only in part the develop-ment of the Catholic church in Chicago whose funda-mental is religion, but whose activities reach out intoeducation, charitable work, orphanages, hospitals, socialwork and civic betterment. Chicagos Catholic population today is declared to be1,200,000. In 1880 the diocese became an archdiocese. Archbishops Great Educational Plan The plans for the future of the Roman Catholic churchin Chicago are indeed spacious, commensurate not only 107 ^\

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c 3 o J3 >. J=! ^ aj r^ • H t S I*- a o o r: Is 0) :: ™ en C fc- O 4-> o y o i| a oT 3 >, -^ ^ J= rt^ CJ « o :, iH s — CTi oo ^ i£ »—» oj •^ o S5 o ^ K C/i_; *z^ ui <-i— i—t o O &.S £ ?► > t- ^:^ _o o J3 aJ CJ ^ rt S o Pi ^_, CO <u 108 with its achievements in Chicago, but with its vast deedsfor civilization throughout the world. The great educational plan of Archbishop Mundelein,which is definitely and rapidly unfolding, centers aboutthe University of St. Mary of the Lake, the seat of whichis being erected on a 1,000-acre tract on the shore ofSt. Mary Lake at Area, near Libertyville, about fortymiles from the heart of the Loop. On this site thedivinity school, including the colleges of philosophy andtheology, are to stand, with the administration building,chapel, dormitories, power houses, library, recreationhalls with terraced lawns, roads and bridges, to cost

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