Latest Chicago Near North Side News

Image from page 22 of “The North and West illustrated for tourist, business and pleasure travel : The popular resorts of California, Nevada, Idaho, Montana, Utah, Wyoming, Colorado, Nebraska, Dakota, Iowa, Illinois, Wisconsin, northern Michigan and Minnes
Chicago Near North Side
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Identifier: northwestillustr1876chic
Title: The North and West illustrated for tourist, business and pleasure travel : The popular resorts of California, Nevada, Idaho, Montana, Utah, Wyoming, Colorado, Nebraska, Dakota, Iowa, Illinois, Wisconsin, northern Michigan and Minnesota. A guide to the lakes and rivers, to the plains and mountains, to the resorts of birds, game animals and fishes; and hints for the commercial traveler, the theatre manager, the land hunter and the emigrant
Year: 1876 (1870s)
Authors: Chicago and North Western Railway Company Stennett, W. H. (William H.), 1832-1915
Subjects:
Publisher: Chicago, Ill. : Chicago & North-Western Railway Co.

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ral smallerones, and the Rock River University, a popular andgrowing college, with a full corps of thoroughlyeducated professors. The business portion of thecity is built on the sides of hills sloping towardsthe river, with the residence portion on the higherhills beyond. It is one of the most sightly andenterprising cities in the West, and bids fair toattain very large proportions. Col. John Dement,who made a national reputation in the BlackHawk War,* still has his home here. In the vicinity of Dixon are many attractive re-sorts and much picturesque scenery, a portion ofwhich we illustrate. A small steamer runs betweenDixon and Grand De Tour, 12 miles, and passesen route many islands and picturesque points ofinterest. Visitors to Dixon will be amply paid bytaking a trip on the river and spending severaldays in its vicinity. The river provides amplefishing grounds, and the fisherman will be abun-dantly repaid by angling in its waters. Gameabounds, the golden plover, upland plover, the

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Dixon, III.—On the Rock River. machine shops with 16 men, Bennett, Thompson &Funks mill with 12 men, Baker & Underwood 42men, a flax and bagging factory 90 men, The GrandDe Tour Plow Works 70 men, Vann & Meanscarriage factory, 15 men, Adams & Davis 20 men, awoolen mill 10 men, a wind mill and pump shop 12men, and Orvis & Co. plow works 75 men. Over0,000 are here invested in manufacturing estab-lishments, operating over 500 men, and paying out inwages over ,000 monthly. Yet with all of thesefactories in active operation, less than one-sixth ofthe water power is used. Large quantities of lime ofa superior quality is made here. The city is wellsupplied with hotels, of which the following are thebest—The Nachusa House, by Major Cheney, for150 guests: The Railroad House, by Person Cheney,with rooms for 100 guests, and a dining room thatcan seat 300 passengers at the dining tables that areso largely patronized by the through passengers ofthe great California ronorthwestillustr1876chic

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Image from page 806 of “The street railway review” (1891)
Chicago
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Identifier: streetrailwayrev14amer
Title: The street railway review
Year: 1891 (1890s)
Authors: American Street Railway Association Street Railway Accountants’ Association of America American Railway, Mechanical, and Electrical Association
Subjects: Street-railroads
Publisher: Chicago : Street Railway Review Pub. Co

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TLN.NEI, UNDER HLIJSO.V RIVER. north on the Manhattan side to a point near 33rd St. and SixthAve., where connection will also be made with the New YorkSubway, and with the tunnel of the Pennsylvania R. R. The importance of this new tunnel under the Hudson River canhardly be overestimated. Within a radius of 25 miles from theJersey terminal there is a resident population of more than amillion and a half nf iicnidp to all of whom New York is the busl-

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KA«T HIDE Of TWI> LUCK l.> >UHTI1 TUNSKL. nnw and Rocial Mecca. More than 300,000 people crosH th<r Hud-Mon Riv»T dally In ferry boats. The new tunnel will permitthroUKh electric, railway Hervlce from Newark. Montilair. theOranKeii. Hackenfuu-k. Knglewood, Iatemon, Passaic. Hayonne.Jersey Cily and Holioken. directly Into Manhattan withoutchaoKe of cars, ll Is bellevrMi the cflrrylnR capacity of this newmeans of communication will lie taxed to ils utmost from the clayday It Is op. ned for reRular lraffl<-. The tunnel just completed is one of two that are beiui; built bythe New York & New Jersey Railroad Co., for the purpose ofcreating physical connections between the network of electricrailway lines in New Jersey, and the surface and subway lines ofManhattan. The tunnel now completed is the northerly one. Thesouth tunnel parallels this a short distance to the south. About2.000 ft. of the south tunnel is now completed and work is pro-gressing at the rate of 42 ft. p

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Latest Chicago Loop News

Image from page 78 of “Chicago” (1917)
Chicago Loop
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Identifier: chicago00chatrich
Title: Chicago
Year: 1917 (1910s)
Authors: Chatfield-Taylor, H. C. (Hobart Chatfield), 1865-1945 Hornby, Lester George, b. 1882, ill
Subjects: Chicago (Ill.) — Description and travel Chicago (Ill.) — History
Publisher: Boston New York : Houghton Mifflin Co.

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lion people of 25 Chicago both sexes are dumped six days a week bythe transportation lines to toil for theirdaily bread. When the office buildings andstores vomit them into the streets at night-fall, they hang to straps in surface,steam, orelevated cars, until they reach the housesand flats they designate as home ; but nosooner is the soot washed from their facesthan a goodly proportion ot them hastenback to the Loop again, for here are theclubs, theatres, restaurants, and hotels, aswell as the banks, offices, and departmentstores. Indeed, when the street lamps andprotean signs begin to glisten, the aspectof the Loop alters entirely. Restless menand neurotic women no longer scamperfrom sky-scraper to sky-scraper; in theirplaces are affable strollers who tarry nowand then to gaze at the modish manikinsdisplayed in the gay shop windows. Thestreet cars still deposit people in the Loop,but they are merry-makers, not toilers, 26 From the Viaduct — The Loop Station at West Randolph Street

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The Heart of the City and some of them actually find time tosmile. The horse truck, moreover, and themotor van have disappeared, and only thelimousine and taxicab remain to menacelife. A cauldron of human endeavor by day,a pleasure spot by night, the Loop is lit-erally, as well as metaphorically, the heartof the city. Technically speaking it is thepart of our so-called Business Districtencircled by the ugly posts and girders ofthe elevated railways. In reality, however,it extends to the lake and river, and as farsouth as the Blackstone Hotel; for withinthis area of less than a square mile is foundeverything material or aesthetic which theinhabitants of our three sides enjoy incommon. Less than fifty years ago this Loop wasa waste of smouldering ruins; yet thebuilder of the sky-scraper has been almostas ruthless a destroyer as the Great Fire 27 Chicago itself, so different in aspect is the businessdistrict of to-day from that which arosefromthe ashes of i 87 i. Should some Rip VanWinkl

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Latest Chicago Near North Side News

Image from page 107 of “The North and West illustrated for tourist, business and pleasure travel : The popular resorts of California, Nevada, Idaho, Montana, Utah, Wyoming, Colorado, Nebraska, Dakota, Iowa, Illinois, Wisconsin, northern Michigan and Minne
Chicago Near North Side
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Identifier: northwestillustr1876chic
Title: The North and West illustrated for tourist, business and pleasure travel : The popular resorts of California, Nevada, Idaho, Montana, Utah, Wyoming, Colorado, Nebraska, Dakota, Iowa, Illinois, Wisconsin, northern Michigan and Minnesota. A guide to the lakes and rivers, to the plains and mountains, to the resorts of birds, game animals and fishes; and hints for the commercial traveler, the theatre manager, the land hunter and the emigrant
Year: 1876 (1870s)
Authors: Chicago and North Western Railway Company Stennett, W. H. (William H.), 1832-1915
Subjects:
Publisher: Chicago, Ill. : Chicago & North-Western Railway Co.

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miles from the city of La Crosse,to which stages run twice daily, connecting withboth our passenger trains. A stage also runs fromhere via Melrose to Black River Falls, three timeseach week. Considerable lumbering is carried on at 98 The North and West Illustrated. this station. From this point a line of railroad isbeing built into La Crosse, and soon we shall haveour through trains running into that enterprisingcity. Midway, 273 miles from Chicago. New Amster-dam, 4 miles distant, McGilroys Ferry, 5 miles,Gales Ferry, and Stevenstown, 5miles, are tributa-ry. La Crosse, 8 miles distant, is reached by stage. Trempealeau, 284 miles from Chicago, is inTrempealeau county, (a large but not densely pop-ulated county,) 7 miles from Galesville, the cap-ital of the county, and has 600 inhabitants. PineCreek, 291 miles, Marshland, 292 miles, andBluff1 Side, 295 miles from Chicago, are new sta-tions. We have now reached the Mississippi river,and will cross it on a fine bridge, built at a cost of

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W. S. Ingrahams Gold Fish Pond, Waukegan, III.—page 105 0,000 by the Chicago & North-Western RailwayCo., and at 297 miles from Chicago reach Winona. This city of 11,000 persons, is the cap-ital of Winona county, Minn., which was organizedin 1854, and has 28,000 inhabitants. Lake Winonaadjoins the city limits, and in an early day was sonoted for its game, that its surroundings were named Prairie aux Isle, or Prairie of Winged Fowl.1Some years after it was named Wabasha Prairie,after the Sioux chief of that name, whose tribe formany generations made this location its home. Thecounty is quite famous for its trout streams. Thecity of Winona is the largest and most important commercial city in Southern Minnesota, and thethird in point of population in the State, and is sit-uated on a beautiful level prairie, on the west bankof the Mississippi river. The first white settlementmade in this place was in 1851. Winona is noted for the natural beauty of its site ;for its healthfulness ;

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Image from page 482 of “An illustrated history of the State of Iowa : being a complete civil, political, and military history of the state, from its first exploration down to 1875; including a cyclopaedia of legislation during the administration of each o
Chicago
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Identifier: illustratedhisto1876tutt
Title: An illustrated history of the State of Iowa : being a complete civil, political, and military history of the state, from its first exploration down to 1875; including a cyclopaedia of legislation during the administration of each of the governors, from Lucas (1836) to Carpenter; with historical and descriptive sketches of each county in the state separately, embracing interesting narratives of pioneer life, including an account of the commercial, agricultural and educational growth of Iowa
Year: 1876 (1870s)
Authors: Tuttle, Charles R. (Charles Richard), b. 1848 Durrie, Daniel S. (Daniel Steele), 1819-1892
Subjects: Mormons
Publisher: Chicago : Richard S. Peale & Company

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grazing farmsof which it is the location. The areaof the county is 315,290 acres. TheDes Moines river waters its northeastcorner, and by its tributaries, SoapLick, Salt creek and Chequest creeks,it drains and renders fruitful a veryextensive range. Fox river, North andSouth Wyacondah and the Sabinsflow through the county on their wayto the Mississippi, affording a plenti-ful water supply and good drainage,and along the several streams, belts andgroves of good timber are very con-veniently located. Smooth prairieswith just enough of rise and fall tosecure adequate drainage constitutethe divides. The records of the county agricul-tural society show the remarkable factthat a premium was awarded duringthe second annual fair for the produc-tion of 138 bushels of corn from a-sin-gle acre. In the following year thepremium for production was awardedfor 213 bushels from one acre, andwheat has been raised to the extent offorty bushels from one acre, the aver-age being nearly twenty. Farming is

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480 Tuttles History of Iowa. well carried out in Davis county, andthe Keokuk and Des Moines railroadcarries to good markets the surplusproductions of the fertile and wellused land. There is no county inIowa which excels Davis for grazingand stock raising. Blue grass is asafe crop every time, but hay, timothyand clover are mainly relied on.Stock runs at large on many of theprairies and the wild grasses fatten aswell as feed them, while there is nodifficulty in their procuring as muchgood water as they desire. Splendidherds enrich the county in many ofits sections, and add much to thebeauty of the quiet scene. Fruits of all kinds that can be pro-duced in temperate climates will growin Davis county, and large quantitieshave actually been shipped. There aremany vineyards in good bearing inthis county, and many varieties flour-ish exceedingly well. The Osage or-ange hedge which comes to a sufficientgrowth in this county in five years,has attracted the attention of the farm-ing community, t

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Latest Chicago Loop News

Image from page 90 of “Chicago” (1917)
Chicago Loop
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Identifier: chicago00chatrich
Title: Chicago
Year: 1917 (1910s)
Authors: Chatfield-Taylor, H. C. (Hobart Chatfield), 1865-1945 Hornby, Lester George, b. 1882, ill
Subjects: Chicago (Ill.) — Description and travel Chicago (Ill.) — History
Publisher: Boston New York : Houghton Mifflin Co.

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>^.. The Heart of the City the eye. Blame not the architects whosetask is to get the most rent per cubic footwith the least possible outlay, but ratherthe avaricious owners of real estate, andthe supine aldermen whose baneful or-dinances have permitted our cities to bedistorted out of all architectural propor-tion. Chicago, however, was the first of-fender, the sky-scraper being its offspring.Alas, if only some Baron Haussmann hadhad the power to stifle it at the momentof its birth, American cities might to-daybe beautiful. Yet in no other way, it seems to me, arethe ideals and characteristics of a peopleat the different periods of its existence sodefinitely expressed as by its architecture,— particularly that which is ecclesiasticalor governmental; and nowhere, 1 believe,is the truth of this so clearly demonstratedas by the different court-houses and cityhalls which have stood from time to time 31 Chicago within the part of the Loop which in thecitys infancy was known as the Pub

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Image from page 728 of “Engineering and Contracting” (1909)
Chicago
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Identifier: engineeringcontr41chicuoft
Title: Engineering and Contracting
Year: 1909 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects:
Publisher: Chicago

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ing building, hump yard, custom house, in-spection sheds, wheel pit, signal towers, yardelectrification, team tracks, etc. With thiswork completed the company now has at thispoint one of the most complete and fullyequipped plants, for the handling of freightand passengers to be found in this country.In this issue we shall treat, principally, of thelayout and architectural features of this im-provement, and in a succeeding issue shallcover the structural features of the work. and with the cross-overs in the train shed inuse about 30 minutes can be saved in makingup the trains and getting them across theriver, from that required to operate to andfrom the Third St. Station. The general scheme is that of a throughstation layout with 10 passenger tracks and 1express track under the cover of the trainshed. There are 7 through freight tracks inthe open south of the train shed and parallelto it at the same elevation. All of the tracks

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Fig. 1. Layout of Passenger Terminal of Michigan Central R. R. at Detroit, Mich. Mich., this improvement being the last stepin the extensive plan worked out by this com-pany. The entire project includes the tunnelsunder the Detroit River, the train sheds,yards and equipment, grade separation andbridges, coach yards, service building, warm- CENKRAL FEATLKES. To avoid the shuttle movement of all trainswhich was necessary when entering and leav-ing the old station the new terminal was lo-cated on the main line about % mile north-west of the tunnel portal. With this location are suiiported on a steel substructure for adistance of about 040 ft., the usable spaceunder the right-of-way being occupied by theInited States mail service and by baggageand express companies, etc. (see Fig. 1).In designing each part of the terminal pro- June 24. l»14. Engineering and Contracting 13 vision has been made for a considerable in-crease in traffic above that now required bythe Michigan Central, in order

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Latest Chicago Loop News

Image from page 38 of “Chicago” (1917)
Chicago Loop
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Identifier: chicago00chatrich
Title: Chicago
Year: 1917 (1910s)
Authors: Chatfield-Taylor, H. C. (Hobart Chatfield), 1865-1945 Hornby, Lester George, b. 1882, ill
Subjects: Chicago (Ill.) — Description and travel Chicago (Ill.) — History
Publisher: Boston New York : Houghton Mifflin Co.

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ng woman beside me. Iadore Chicago, she exclaimed. It is thepulse of America. 3 Chicago For fifteen years that tribute to mynative city has been ringing in my ears;— and now when my task, is to write ofits life, both new and old, those wordsof Sarah Bernhardt come impulsively tomind as the best with which to character-ize its individuality among the cities ofthe world. A little upstart village, an Englishtraveler called Chicago at the time whenthe building of the Illinois and MichiganCanal was begun. Barely a decade afterthe first boat had passed through its locks,our city contained a hundred thousand en-ergetic souls; and now, just eighty yearssince the first spadeful of earth was turnedfor the digging of that momentous ditch, ithouses well considerably two million men,women, and children foregathered frompractically every land on earth. The new-est great City of the newest great Coun-try, it is the held in which industrial wars 4 State Street from the Van Buren Loop Station •fMY

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The River of the Portage are fought and civic experiments tested— the crucible in which a most dispro-portionate mixture of native and alienmanhood is fused into American citizen-ship. May not this municipality which hasgrown from a little upstart village to ahuge upstart city within the ken of someborn within its limits, who are still in theland of the living, be termed, without un-due bravado, The pulse of America ? To the stranger within her gates themost forbidding part of Chicago is the re-gion of dilapidated buildings and ill-pavedstreets adjoining the Rush Street Bridge.Yet this rookery is the part of our city bestentitled to be qualified as old, for here isthe seat of a history vying in age withalmost any in the land. Here, too, is themain reach of the river whence sprang thecitys greatness and from which it takes itsname. Once it flowed turbid into the lake; now 5 Chicago it runs lucid, albeit artificially, to the Mis-sissippi. Yet to the casual beholder it hasever been unp

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Image from page 430 of “Diseases of the dog and their treatment” (1911)
Chicago Loop
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Identifier: diseasesofdogthe00ml
Title: Diseases of the dog and their treatment
Year: 1911 (1910s)
Authors: Müller, Georg Alfred, 1851-1923 Glass, Alexander
Subjects: Horses Dogs — Diseases
Publisher: Chicago, Ill. : Alexander Eger

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for instance the bladder, loops of intestine, or theomentum. Cadeac found in a unilateral inguinal rupture the size ofa childs head on the right side, the entire intestinal tract and on theleft side the omentum, the spleen, uterus and the bladder. An 390 HERNIAL RUPTURE inguinal hernia in the l)itch if it is of any size is easily recognized (Fig.128). It is found in the posterior part of the mammary gland, an enlarge-ment varying in size, elastic, painless, with no increase of the local tem-perature. When the animal is placed on her back, it either returns toits normal position by natural gravitation or else it is reduced with verylittle manipulation. On the return of the contents of the hernial sac theabdominal ring is found to be very much dilated above normal. Inrare instances it may be found impossible to reduce the hernia entirely,and this is found to be due to certain adhesions of the abdominal contentsto the pouch or else to a pregnant uterus; in the latter case the fcBtus can

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Fig. 128.—Inguinal hernia of bitch. easily be detected by manipulation. In certain cases where there is adoubt as to the exact nature of an enlargement in the position of inguinalhernia, if it is the uterus in the sac, on introducing the finger into thevagina, that is found to be elongated and deviated to one side, due tothe stretching and weight of the uterus, and it is also found that it isimpossible to reach the os uteri with the end of the finger. In very rarecases when the round ligament of the uterus (false inguinal hernia) isgreatly hypertrophied, it might be possible to mistake it for inguinalhernia. (False inguinal hernia.) As a rule inguinal hernia in the bitchis rarely involved in strangulation, and if s^hc should be in whelp, shehas her puppies without trouble. A bitch affected with inguinal hernia nuist be carefully fed, avoiding UMBILICAL HERNIA 391 food that is hard to digest, or has a tendency to cause flatulence or to con-stipate. If it becomes necessary to remove t

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Image from page 224 of “The New York Tribune’s history of the United States, from the discovery of America until the present time, with a pocket atlas of the world, containing colored maps of each state and territory in the United States, with statistics
Chicago
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Identifier: newyorktribunesh00hass
Title: The New York Tribune’s history of the United States, from the discovery of America until the present time, with a pocket atlas of the world, containing colored maps of each state and territory in the United States, with statistics showing products and resources of the various states; also, maps of every country in the world
Year: 1887 (1880s)
Authors: Hassard, John R. G. (John Rose Greene), 1836-1888
Subjects: Atlases
Publisher: Chicago, Rand, McNally

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t average value of ; oxen and other cattle,January, 1884, 520,000, valued at ,840,000. Stringent laws to protect from encroachments by whites. Theycan hold land only by marrying into one of the tribes. Recentofllcial reports give Indian population about 80,000: Cherokees,20.000; Choctaws, 16,500; Creeks, 14,500; Chickasaws, 7,000; Semi-noles, 2,500; Osages, 2,390; Cheyennes, 3,298; Arapahoes, 2,676;Kiowas, 1,120; Pawnees, 1,438: Comanches, 1,475. No Territorial government has as yet been organized, owing todifferences in the views of Congress and the tribes. For eachagency, a deputy is appointed by the President to represent theunited States, but each tribe manages its own internal affairs.Mostof tlie tribes governed by chiefs. Of first five tribes, 83,6.50 can read, and have 16,200 houses, 196Bchools, and 8,250 pupils. Expended from tribal funds for educa-tional purposes, 6,856; from government appropriation forfreedmen, ,500. ATLAS OF THE WORLD. 151 MAP OF INDIAN TERRITORY.

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16» ATLAS OF THE WOULD. COLORADO. Kol-o-rahdo. •♦ Centennial State. Part of Louisiana purchase of 1803. First explored by VaequtaCoronado under the Spanish, 1540. First expedition sent out byUnited States Government, under Major Pike, 1806; a second undercommand of Col. S. H. Long, 18-20, and in 1842-44, Gen. John C.Fremont made his celebrated trip across the Rocky Mountains.First settlements made by miners, 1858-9; formed from parts ofKansas, Nebraska, Utah and New Mexico ; organized as a Ter-ritory, February, 1861; admitted August 1,1876. Area, 103,925 square miles ; lengm, 380 miles ; breadth, 280miles ; principal rivers. North and South Platte, Arkansas, Snake,White and Green. Number counties, 40. Temperature at Denver:winter, 25° to 37° ; summer. 72° to 74°. Rainfall of the Stale from15 to 20 inches, falling mostly between May and Julv. Five United States laud districts, with offices at Oenver, Pueblo,Falrplay, Lake City and Central City. Denver, capital and metrop-olis,

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