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Image from page 150 of “Nature neighbors, embracing birds, plants, animals, minerals, in natural colors by color photography, containing articles by Gerald Alan Abbott, Dr. Albert Schneider, William Kerr Higley…and other eminent naturalists. Ed. by Nath
Chicago
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Identifier: natureneighborse51914bant
Title: www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/book…
Year: 1914 (1910s)
Authors: Banta, Nathaniel Moore, 1867- Schneider, Albert, 1863- Higley, William Kerr, 1860-1908 Abbott, Gerard Alan
Subjects: Natural history
Publisher: Chicago, American Audobon association

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ected. THE WATER-THRUSH* The Water-thrush has so many popular names that itwill be recognized by most observers by one or more ofthem. It is called small-billed water-thrush, water wagtail,water kick-up, Besoy kick-up, and river pink (Jamaica),aquatic accentor, and New York aquatic thrush. It isfound chiefly east of the Mississippi River, north to theArctic Coast, breeding from the north border of the UnitedStates northward. It winters in more southern UnitedStates, all of middle America, northern South America, andall of West Indies. It is accidental in Greenland. In Illi-nois this species is known as a migrant, passing slowlythrough in spring and fall, though in the extreme southernportion a few pass the winter, especially if the season bemild. It frequents swampy woods and open, wet places,nesting on the ground or in the roots of overturned trees atthe borders of swamps. Mr. M. K. Barnum, of Syracuse,New York, found a nest of this species in the roots of a f-rt^^^^v:<^ J!3I^I00^

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Image from page 118 of “North Park College catalog” (1892)
Chicago
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Identifier: northparkcollege19141920nort
Title: North Park College catalog
Year: 1892 (1890s)
Authors: North Park College and Theological Seminary
Subjects: North Park College and Theological Seminary
Publisher: Chicago, Ill. : [s.n.]

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Officials, Private Secretaries, Sales Correspondents,and Teaming Contractors. Together 17. Our alumni, it seems, are to be found in three continents, America,Asia, and Europe. As to their distribution over the United States Mr.Ost gives the somewhat astonishing report that almost half of theirnumber, or 278, live in Illinois. Other States especially favored areMinnesota, with 52, Michigan, with 35, Nebraska, with 32, Iowa, with31, California, with 15, Washington, with 12, and New York, with 9.Two states, Massachusetts and Pennsylvania, can boast 7. ConnecticutThe Alumni nas ^ anc^ a ^e num^er is claimed by Canada and AlaskaWorld and China. Kansas has 5, and as many live in Sweden. Other States in the Union, claiming from 1 to 4, are: Indiana, Arizona,Montana, Oregon, South Dakota, Colorado, Missouri, Texas, Idaho, NewHampshire, North Caroline, Ohio, and Wyoming, in all 26 States. Meas-ured by the boundaries of our alumni habitation, the constituency ofNorth Park College is the World.

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ijjoToj fy JRtindstocfe Q feu) oft§e pretty scenes in Ijort!) fiir^near tfje college. 28 NORTH IAHK COLLEGE. C h apte r T iv o. (&tnm\ information. 1. LOCATION. North Park College is located in the beautiful suburb ofNorth Park within the northwestern Limits of Chicago, 111.It is most conveniently reached from the city by the Ravens-wood Branch of the Northwestern Elevated Railroad, whichhas its terminal four blocks south of the College. It may bereached also by surface lines, such as the Lawrence Avenueline, which runs within three blocks of the school, and theKedzie Avenue line, which has its terminal at the campus.The campus of the school contains eight and one-half acres,providing ample room for the buildings and a large ath-letic field. It is bounded on the south by the North Branchof the Chicago River. North Park College is thus situatedin pleasant natural surroundings and has convenient com-munications with the city of Chicago. 2. AIM. The object of the school is five-fold

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Image from page 372 of “North Dakota history and people; outlines of American history” (1917)
Chicago
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Identifier: northdakotahisto01loun
Title: North Dakota history and people; outlines of American history
Year: 1917 (1910s)
Authors: Lounsberry, Clement A. (Clement Augustus), 1843-1926
Subjects: North Dakota — History North Dakota — Biography
Publisher: Chicago, The S.J. Clarke Pub. co.

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an office. It was known that he intended to join the malcontentsat the Pine Ridge Agency and that he had been invited to come there for Godwas about to appear. He had asked permission to go but had prepared to gowithout permission. So on September 14, 1890, it was determined to make thearrest without further delay. There were some forty Indian police available andtwo companies of military, by forced marching from Fort Yates, were placed insupporting distance. Sitting Bulls arrest was made withovit resistance, but the police were imme-diately surrounded by one hundred and fifty or more of his friends on whomTie called to rescue him. Whereupon they rushed upon the police and engaged ina hand-to-hand battle. One of Sitting Bulls followers shot Lieut. Bull Head,the officer in command of the Indian police, in the side. Bull Head turned andshot Sitting Bull, who was also shot at the same time by Sergt. Red Tomahawk.Sergt. Shave Head was also shot. Catch the Bear, of Sitting Bulls party, who

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FOUETEEN FOOT LIGNITE SEAM ON LITTLE MISSOURI RIVER, NORTH-WESTERN DAKOTA X HISTORY OF NORTH DAKOTA 251 fired the first shot, was killed by Alone Man, one of the Indian police. Therewere eight of Sitting Bulls party killed, including his seventeen-year-old son.The Indian pohce lost six killed or mortally wounded. Most of Sitting Bullsfollowers joined the Indians in the Bad Lands. Two weeks later, under the humane and fearless work of the military officers,most of the Indians who fled to the Band Lands on the approach of the militaryhad been induced to return to their agencies. Big Foots band and a few of Sitting Bulls Indians only remained in thefield. Big Foot had agreed to surrender. He was ill with pneumonia, and thearmy physician had made him comfortable in his tepee. The pipe of peace hungon the center pole of his lodge. A white flag floated from the middle of his campin token of his surrender. The women and children stood about the doors ofthe tepees, watching the soldiers in th

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Latest Chicago Near North Side News

Image from page 40 of “The North and West illustrated for tourist, business and pleasure travel : The popular resorts of California, Nevada, Idaho, Montana, Utah, Wyoming, Colorado, Nebraska, Dakota, Iowa, Illinois, Wisconsin, northern Michigan and Minnes
Chicago Near North Side
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Identifier: northwestillustr1876chic
Title: The North and West illustrated for tourist, business and pleasure travel : The popular resorts of California, Nevada, Idaho, Montana, Utah, Wyoming, Colorado, Nebraska, Dakota, Iowa, Illinois, Wisconsin, northern Michigan and Minnesota. A guide to the lakes and rivers, to the plains and mountains, to the resorts of birds, game animals and fishes; and hints for the commercial traveler, the theatre manager, the land hunter and the emigrant
Year: 1876 (1870s)
Authors: Chicago and North Western Railway Company Stennett, W. H. (William H.), 1832-1915
Subjects:
Publisher: Chicago, Ill. : Chicago & North-Western Railway Co.

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e: The Ogden, (recentlyrebuilt), having 125 rooms;Pacific, 75 rooms; Metropol-itan, 25 rooms; Bryant, 20rooms; Clifton, 25 rooms;and Farmers, 20 rooms;charges range from .50 toS3 per day. Since the bridgeacross the river here wasbuilt, an effort has beenmade by the people ofCouncil Bluffs to have thetrains of the Union PacificRoad cross the bridge, andmake Council Bluffs theeastern terminus of thatline, but owing to variouscomplications their termi-nus was held at Omaha, onthe opposite side of theriver, and the trains of theIowa lines made CouncilBluffs their western termi-nus. The result was adouble transfer, the passen-gers from the trains fromthe East debarking here,getting into a transfertrain that crossed thebridge, and again debarkingon the Omaha side, andthere taking the westbound trains of the UnionPacific Road. Coming fromthe West similar transferswere made. A recent decis-ion of the Supreme Courtof the United States seemsto have settled the ques-tion, and very soon a joint

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32 The North and West Illustrated. depot is promised for the east bank of the river,and the usual double transfer will be avoided. AtCouncil Bluffs we makeclose connections withthe trains of The Kansas City, St. Joseph & Council, Bluffs Railroad, which are taken byour passengers for St. Joseph, Atchison, Leaven-worth, Kansas City, and other Western Missouriand Kansas towns. Omaha. Hurriedly we have spanned the 492 miles that separate Chicago from Omaha, andcrossing the beautiful railroad bridge (a view of which we give,) you are landed inthat live, wide-awake city, whose name is Omaha. There you will find the GrandCentral Hotel, with our ticket offices therein, many fine business houses, built alongfinely graded and paved streets, that are constantly crowded with the evidences of alarge and rapidly growing trade. Besides the Grand Central, the city contains severalother good hotels, an opera house, fine school houses, churches, public halls, largemanufacturing establishments, the

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Latest Chicago Loop News

Image from page 108 of “Chicago” (1917)
Chicago Loop
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Identifier: chicago00chatrich
Title: Chicago
Year: 1917 (1910s)
Authors: Chatfield-Taylor, H. C. (Hobart Chatfield), 1865-1945 Hornby, Lester George, b. 1882, ill
Subjects: Chicago (Ill.) — Description and travel Chicago (Ill.) — History
Publisher: Boston New York : Houghton Mifflin Co.

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are rich in historic memory, thenames Briggs, Revere, and Clifton stillremaining, like that of Sherman, to recall 39 Chicago the days when the treasonable murmuringsof our Copperheads were so completelystifled by the Lumbardsstirring singing ofthe songs of George F. Root, that our fullquota of troops was dispatched to thefront. Although the Palmer House and theGrand Pacific were barely under roofwhen the Great Fire swept them away, thehotels which now bear these names areamong the oldest buildings in the Loop,typifying to my generation the after-the-Fire period, when we were bending our en-ergies to the re-creation of our city. Ourhomes were then in tree-lined avenues—Dearborn, LaSalle, Michigan, Prairie, andCalumet — and one or the other of thesepalatial hotels, as we were wont to callthem, was the Mecca of our social pilgrim-ages downtown. Will any old Chica-goan ever forget the annual game dinnerat the Grand Pacific, when in best bib and 40 LaSalle Street at the Stock Exchange

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b \ • < The Heart of the City tucker we partook of such obsolete viandsas antelope steak and roast buffalo broughtto us by grinning darkies, each balancingupon an upturned palm a tray filled withdishes shaped like canary birds bathtubs?The Palmer House, the Grand Pacific,and also the new Tremont House werethen our pride, and their bonifaces amongour most esteemed citizens; for who didnot cherish a nod of recognition fromPotter Palmer, John B. Drake, or John A.Rice? Their marble-floored lobbies wereour accustomed haunts, — except at con-vention time, when the slouch-hattedhenchmen of Grant, Blaine, Logan, orGarfield usurped our easy chairs and sul-lied our favorite corners with their tobaccojuice. The sky-scraping hotels of to-daywith their maitres d hotel, gar cons de res-taurmit, and cuisines francaises, are not ofour Chicago soil as were those hostelriesof the after-the-Fire period; nor do they 41 Chicago play so notable a part in the life of thecity. Indeed, the Palmer House

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Image from page 806 of “The street railway review” (1891)
Chicago
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Identifier: streetrailwayrev14amer
Title: The street railway review
Year: 1891 (1890s)
Authors: American Street Railway Association Street Railway Accountants’ Association of America American Railway, Mechanical, and Electrical Association
Subjects: Street-railroads
Publisher: Chicago : Street Railway Review Pub. Co

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inthe last few years. They are the Inventions of Mr. John A. Brill,vice-president of (he J. G. Brill Co. f.TH Yi:ak. N.I. 4—Ot-T. 14. 1904.1 I».\ir,Y STREKT IJAILW.W i;i;\ IKW. 787 These cars are equipped with Brill anglc^iron bumpers, radialdraw-bars, ratchet brake bandies. Dedenda gongs, conductorsgongs, foldins gates, round-corner seat-end panels, tradj scrapersand Dumpit sand boxes. All the trucks shown have side frames solid forged in a singlepiece—a method o( construction peculiar to the J. G. Brill Co. COMPLETED TUNNEL UNDER THE HUDSON RIVER. The first of the projected tunnels under the Hudson Kiver.connecting New York Cit.v with the New Jersey river front, is nowcompleted. The new tunnel rvins from 15th St.. Hobokefa. to apoint near Christopher St., Manhattan, and it will be used ulti-mately for bringing the electric cars of the Public Service Cor-poration into direit connection with the cars of the Metropolitansystem in New York. It is the intention to extend the tunnel

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TLN.NEI, UNDER HLIJSO.V RIVER. north on the Manhattan side to a point near 33rd St. and SixthAve., where connection will also be made with the New YorkSubway, and with the tunnel of the Pennsylvania R. R. The importance of this new tunnel under the Hudson River canhardly be overestimated. Within a radius of 25 miles from theJersey terminal there is a resident population of more than amillion and a half nf iicnidp to all of whom New York is the busl-

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Image from page 83 of “The North and West illustrated for tourist, business and pleasure travel : The popular resorts of California, Nevada, Idaho, Montana, Utah, Wyoming, Colorado, Nebraska, Dakota, Iowa, Illinois, Wisconsin, northern Michigan and Minnes
Chicago Near North Side
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: northwestillustr1876chic
Title: The North and West illustrated for tourist, business and pleasure travel : The popular resorts of California, Nevada, Idaho, Montana, Utah, Wyoming, Colorado, Nebraska, Dakota, Iowa, Illinois, Wisconsin, northern Michigan and Minnesota. A guide to the lakes and rivers, to the plains and mountains, to the resorts of birds, game animals and fishes; and hints for the commercial traveler, the theatre manager, the land hunter and the emigrant
Year: 1876 (1870s)
Authors: Chicago and North Western Railway Company Stennett, W. H. (William H.), 1832-1915
Subjects:
Publisher: Chicago, Ill. : Chicago & North-Western Railway Co.

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for a line ofsteamers, calling at all the localities named. Theclimate of Portage lake in the summer is one ofthe most delicious on the American continent, and,aside from its great attraction as the site of the 74 The North and West Illustrated. largest copper industry in the world, the tourist orpleasure seeker will find much to interest in study-ing the scenery on either side of the lake. Thesection also affords some excellent trout streams. Names of silver and copper mines in the LakeSuperior country, which may be reached via Mar-quette, Houghton & Ontonagon Railroad, andsteamers from LAnse: Copper—Calumet andHecla, Copper Harbor, Atlantic, Hancock, EagleRiver, Pewabic, Allouez, Franklin, Osceola, Phoe-nix, Quincy, Albany and Bos. Silver—Superior,Cleveland, Collins, Ontonagon, Pittsburg, Excel-sior, Scranton, Luzerne, and several others, Portage Lake is an irregular body of water,about twenty miles in length, extending nearlyacross Keweenaw Point to within two miles of Lake

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The Mills at Minneapolis, Minn.—page 90 Superior. Steamers and sail-vessels drawing 1*2feet can pass through Portage Entry, and navigatethe lake with safety. This body oi water was an oldand favorite thoroughfare for the Indians, and theJesuit Fathers who first discovered and exploredthis section of the country. During the wintermonths the atmosphere is very clear and transpar- ent in the vicinity of Houghton, and all throughKeweenaw Point; objects can be seen at a greatdistance on a clear day, while sounds are conveyeddistinctly through the atmosphere, presenting aphenomenon peculiar to all northern latitudes.This is the season of health and pleasure to thepermanent residents. Portage and Lake Superior Ship Canal. Thisimportant work was commenced in 1868, andfinished in 1873, at a cost of about ,500,000. Itslength is 2X miles, with piers 600 feet in length,extending out into Lake Superior on the north,affording a safe entrance for downward boundvessels. The canal is 100 feet wide

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Image from page 113 of “The North and West illustrated for tourist, business and pleasure travel : The popular resorts of California, Nevada, Idaho, Montana, Utah, Wyoming, Colorado, Nebraska, Dakota, Iowa, Illinois, Wisconsin, northern Michigan and Minne
Chicago Near North Side
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Identifier: northwestillustr1876chic
Title: The North and West illustrated for tourist, business and pleasure travel : The popular resorts of California, Nevada, Idaho, Montana, Utah, Wyoming, Colorado, Nebraska, Dakota, Iowa, Illinois, Wisconsin, northern Michigan and Minnesota. A guide to the lakes and rivers, to the plains and mountains, to the resorts of birds, game animals and fishes; and hints for the commercial traveler, the theatre manager, the land hunter and the emigrant
Year: 1876 (1870s)
Authors: Chicago and North Western Railway Company Stennett, W. H. (William H.), 1832-1915
Subjects:
Publisher: Chicago, Ill. : Chicago & North-Western Railway Co.

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ogicalSchool and Womans College. Sixteen hundred 104 The North and West Illustrated. students are beiug educated here. In the city aregas works, water works, twelve churches, one news-paper, banks, and many fine business houses. Wilmette, (Indian, Ouilmette) is 14 miles fromChicago, and has 500 residents. It is located in anatural grove of hard wood trees, which lend theirattractions to the place. Winnetka. The name is said to be Indian, forBeautiful Land, which well describes the village.It has a population of 900 souls, four churches, fineschools, one of 600 scholars, a hotel for 100 guests,and business houses enough to supply all the com-mercial wants of the people. This also is a temper-ance village. Lake Side, 18 miles out, is a grow-ing village. Glencoe, 19 miles from Chicago, wasfirst settled by W. S. Gurnee, in 1869, and has now500 residents. The village is half a mile from thestation, and has natural groves, good water, schools,and churches. Ravinia, 21 miles from Chicago, is

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Lake Dells, Milwaukee, Wis.—page pushing itself into notice as a pleasant suburb ofChicago. Highland Park, 23 miles from Chicago, has acharming location, on high bluffs overlooking LakeMichigan. The town was laid out by a companythat has spent much money in building streets andwalks, and otherwise improving it. It has severalgood schools, four churches, and excellent society.Highland Hall was built for a hotel, and is used forthat purpose from May to September, while, duringthe rest of the year, it is occupied as a Collegiate In-stitution for the education of young ladies, with thefollowing broad and comprehensive curriculum : A Preparatory Department—with the usual Ele-mentary Branches, pursued with great thorough-ness ; a Department of Literature— including Gram-mar, Ancient, Medieval and Modern History, Rhet-oric, Composition, Literature, and Criticism; aDepartment of Natural Science—including Physics,Chemistry, Astronomy, Mineralogy, Geology, Zool-ogy, and Botany; a Mathem

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Image from page 74 of “The North and West illustrated for tourist, business and pleasure travel : The popular resorts of California, Nevada, Idaho, Montana, Utah, Wyoming, Colorado, Nebraska, Dakota, Iowa, Illinois, Wisconsin, northern Michigan and Minnes
Chicago Near North Side
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Identifier: northwestillustr1876chic
Title: The North and West illustrated for tourist, business and pleasure travel : The popular resorts of California, Nevada, Idaho, Montana, Utah, Wyoming, Colorado, Nebraska, Dakota, Iowa, Illinois, Wisconsin, northern Michigan and Minnesota. A guide to the lakes and rivers, to the plains and mountains, to the resorts of birds, game animals and fishes; and hints for the commercial traveler, the theatre manager, the land hunter and the emigrant
Year: 1876 (1870s)
Authors: Chicago and North Western Railway Company Stennett, W. H. (William H.), 1832-1915
Subjects:
Publisher: Chicago, Ill. : Chicago & North-Western Railway Co.

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Cross was first erected, and here the firstmass said, in the territory now included within thelimits of the State of Wisconsin—and is almostwithout a rival in the State in the inducements itoffers to summer tourists, or to those who desire acool and pleasant retreat from the heat and mala-ria of the South. The ancient settlement hasnearly passed away, but there remains sufficient to recall the memories of the past; while the moderncity, with its spacious and elegant hotels, its fineschool houses and other public buildings, its largeand well-filled stores, and its beautiful privateresidences, make a pleasing contrast with theremains of the past. The city is surrounded on all sides but one bywater; lying in the point of land at the conflucnoeof the Fox and East rivers, and about a mile fromthe mouth of the former. Both of these rivers arenavigable for steamers, the Fox river being navi-gable for the largest class of lake vessels. It hasalso connection, through the Ghken Bay & Min-

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The Cliff House, Devils Lake, Wis.—page 82. nesota Railwat, with Winona, St. Paul andMinneapolis, and all the magnificent scenery ofNorthern Minnesota. It is connected with bothshores of Green Bay by comfortable and convenientsteamers. A line of steamers connects with thetrains of the Chicago & North-Western Railway,and makes tri-weekly trips up the east coast ofGreen Bay, making landings at Fish River, Stur-geon Bay, and other ports on that shore. Green Bay, with its suburbs, contains a popula-tion of 12,000 to 15,000 persons. It is noted for thehealthfulness of its climate—enjoying almost en-tire immunity from all epidemic diseases. The cityis laid out with great precision and regularity—itsstreets being all broad and straight, and the mostof them are shaded by rows of magnificent oldmaples, elms and poplars on either side, that, insome cases, interlace their boughs in the centre;this gives to the place a charming rural aspect,while at the same time it has all the advantag

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Image from page 81 of “The North and West illustrated for tourist, business and pleasure travel : The popular resorts of California, Nevada, Idaho, Montana, Utah, Wyoming, Colorado, Nebraska, Dakota, Iowa, Illinois, Wisconsin, northern Michigan and Minnes
Chicago Near North Side
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: northwestillustr1876chic
Title: The North and West illustrated for tourist, business and pleasure travel : The popular resorts of California, Nevada, Idaho, Montana, Utah, Wyoming, Colorado, Nebraska, Dakota, Iowa, Illinois, Wisconsin, northern Michigan and Minnesota. A guide to the lakes and rivers, to the plains and mountains, to the resorts of birds, game animals and fishes; and hints for the commercial traveler, the theatre manager, the land hunter and the emigrant
Year: 1876 (1870s)
Authors: Chicago and North Western Railway Company Stennett, W. H. (William H.), 1832-1915
Subjects:
Publisher: Chicago, Ill. : Chicago & North-Western Railway Co.

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mp;Lyons, proprietors. This house is situated close tothe waters of the bay, and is a charming locationfor a summer home. Mesdames Williams andSherman keep excellent boarding houses. Therates for private board range from to perweek. A daily line of Pullman Palace Cars is runbetween Chicago and Marquette, by the Chicago &North-Western Railway Company. Marquette, as a watering place, cannot well beexcelled. Romantic scen-ery surrounding one onevery side, a cool, bracingatmosphere, which, tothose who may be suffer-ing from the heat of asummer sun, is, as itwere, the balm ofGilead. In the fore-ground a beautiful bayspreads away to the dis-tant shore (which is oftencompared to the bay ofVenice), whose silverywaters often lie like animmense mirror beneaththe rays of the settingsun, and when dottedwith vessels and steam-ers, presents a sceneworthy the pencil of anartist. Salmon troutabound in its waters, andare often taken by trol-ling, weighing from fiveto twenty-five pounds each

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The Falls of Minnehaha, Minn.—page 90 One person not infre-quently captures from one to twenty fish per day,in the season. There are a number of streams inthe vicinity, where the speckled beauties are await-ing the fly of the angler. Marquette has a population of about 8,000. It islighted with gas, and is supplied with water fromthe cool, crystal lake by the Holly water system. To the invalid or tourist, needing a few weeksrecreation, we-recommend them by all means toseek the pure air and splendid climate in andaround the fair city of Marquette. Sailing over thebroad, clear waters of Lake Superior, trolling forthe large thirty-pound lake fish, beating the moun-tain streams for speckled trout, visiting the rollingmills, furnaces, mines, and other objects of interest,will serve to pass away several weeks in an amusingand profitable manner. The hotels here are wellkept, very comfortable and charges reasonable. We quote from the Mining Journal: Thepeople of Marquette are remarkably well

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