Latest Chicago Near North Side News

Image from page 192 of “Chicago” (1917)
Chicago Near North Side
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Identifier: chicago00chatrich
Title: Chicago
Year: 1917 (1910s)
Authors: Chatfield-Taylor, H. C. (Hobart Chatfield), 1865-1945 Hornby, Lester George, b. 1882, ill
Subjects: Chicago (Ill.) — Description and travel Chicago (Ill.) — History
Publisher: Boston New York : Houghton Mifflin Co.
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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or, marveling at the sightof Chicago by night. Around me dimanchor-lights were glimmering over thewater; while the steam of locomotives,curling upward in fantastic clouds, veiledthe huge buildings before me in alluringmystery. Far above the glare of MichiganAvenue, their roofs and pinnacles were 86 The South Side outlined against the citys radiance. Somewere in darkness, others rimmed withlight; here and there an electric signflashed its brilliant hues; into the wavesbeyond reached the Municipal Pier, itsgraceful towers and slender form ablazewith innumerable lamps. Under the spell of the scene I pictureda little garrison retreating in despair alonga desert shore barely a century ago; thentried to realize that yonder broad stretchof parkland had been made before myeyes, and that I had seen one row ofbuildings on this water front destroyedby fire, and still another demolished tomake way for these mighty structureslooming in the night. Where the Lake Shore Drive begins V. The North Side

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-r.—^ VTHE NORTH SIDE CHICAGO appeared raw and bare toMiss Harriet Martiheau when shevisited it exactly eighty years ago: yet sheconfessed that she had never seen a busierplace. It was enjoying at the time a boomin land values which a panic was soon todispel, and storekeepers hailed her, as shepassed their doors, with ofFers of farms andbuilding-sites. The streets, moreover, werefilled with speculators who crowded abouta scarlet-coated negro on a white horsewhenever he waved a red flag and shoutedthe time and place of the next sale of lotsalong the proposed course of the Illinoisand Michigan Canal. Though the city numbered less thanfive thousand inhabitants then, the Eng-lish authoress acknowledges that there was 91 Chicago some allowable pride in the place aboutits society, her astonishment at havingfound an assemblage of educated, re-fined, and wealthy persons living on theedge of a wild prairie being shared, Iventure to say, by many an Eastern vis-itor to the Chicago of the prese

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Latest Chicago Loop News

Image from page 90 of “Chicago” (1917)
Chicago Loop
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Identifier: chicago00chatrich
Title: Chicago
Year: 1917 (1910s)
Authors: Chatfield-Taylor, H. C. (Hobart Chatfield), 1865-1945 Hornby, Lester George, b. 1882, ill
Subjects: Chicago (Ill.) — Description and travel Chicago (Ill.) — History
Publisher: Boston New York : Houghton Mifflin Co.
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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ol; yet seldom would it thrill 29 Chicago to architectural beauty, and then onlybecause an occasional architect had dis-covered that a sky-scraper need not ofnecessity be either entirely shoddy or en-tirely ugly. There is, for example, an aca-demic appropriateness in the utilitarianGothic of the new University Club, anda feeling of architectural correctness inthe graceful Renaissance bank building atthe northeast corner of Monroe and ClarkStreets; for here, at least, there is pleasingimposture, its base giving the appearanceof sufficient strength to bear its weight. Occasionally, too, a note of original-ity is sounded, as in the case of the CityClub; but, generally speaking, the Loop isbarren of architectural charm. Its gran-deur is inspiring, I confess, like that otlower New York; but a lover of the beau-tiful will search it almost in vain, as he willthe business district of any American city,for that which delights, rather than thrills, 30 The Market in South Water Street ^^-^-n. ^^

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Latest Chicago Loop News

Image from page 185 of “Chicago, a history and forecast” (1921)
Chicago Loop
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Identifier: chicagohistoryfor00harp
Title: Chicago, a history and forecast
Year: 1921 (1920s)
Authors: Harper, William Hudson, 1857- ed Chicago Association of Commerce and Industry Quaife, Milo Milton, 1880-1959 McIlvaine, Mabel
Subjects: Chicago (Ill.) — Description and travel Chicago (Ill.) — History
Publisher: [Chicago] The Chicago association of commerce

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g stations oryards located on less valuable property and equippedfor sorting and schedule loading of L. C. L. freight.Indeed, the commission would apply the co-operativeprinciple by establishing in centers of traffic some uni-versal freight receiving stations for outbound L. C. L.freight. This would reduce unnecessary teaming andstreet congestion. The commission favors considerationof the two or more level plan in the future developmentof freight facilities in congested areas. Forthcoming electrification would be greatly reducedby simplifying and unifying the passenger tracks enter-ing the city; by removing the present tangle of lines;by establishment of direct instead of roundabout routes 181 within the city; and by the joint use of tracks availablefor and adequate for more railway companies than thosewhich now utilize these particular tracks. The adoptionof outlying co-operative freight stations would greatlysimplify the electrification of more central freight ter-minals and tracks.

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o bC IB 3o C/3 182 Since its creation the Railway Terminal Commissionhas acted in an advisory capacity to the city council onall matters pertaining to railway terminals. In this wayit has been enabled to direct all actions of the councilin matters pertaining to them. After the passage of the West Side union station ordi-nance, the two problems of greatest importance as affect-ing the terminal situation in the central business districtwere: first, the development of an adequate passengerterminal station on the property of the Illinois CentralRailroad on the lake front and Roosevelt Road; second,the straightening of the Chicago River and the rearrange-ment and consolidation of railroad terminal facilities inthe territory south of the Loop district between StateStreet and the Chicago River. The passage by the city council July 21, 1919, ofthe so-called Illinois Central-lake front ordinance wasthe culmination of several years intensive work on thepart of the commission and was considered

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Latest Chicago Near North Side News

Image from page 50 of “The North and West illustrated for tourist, business and pleasure travel : The popular resorts of California, Nevada, Idaho, Montana, Utah, Wyoming, Colorado, Nebraska, Dakota, Iowa, Illinois, Wisconsin, northern Michigan and Minnes
Chicago Near North Side
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Identifier: northwestillustr1876chic
Title: The North and West illustrated for tourist, business and pleasure travel : The popular resorts of California, Nevada, Idaho, Montana, Utah, Wyoming, Colorado, Nebraska, Dakota, Iowa, Illinois, Wisconsin, northern Michigan and Minnesota. A guide to the lakes and rivers, to the plains and mountains, to the resorts of birds, game animals and fishes; and hints for the commercial traveler, the theatre manager, the land hunter and the emigrant
Year: 1876 (1870s)
Authors: Chicago and North Western Railway Company Stennett, W. H. (William H.), 1832-1915
Subjects:
Publisher: Chicago, Ill. : Chicago & North-Western Railway Co.

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on the higherbluffs. The poor farmand almshouse of Clin-ton county adjoin the vil- -=lage. The village has one ^f^school, three churches,two flour mills, and onehotel, The Sherman House, Stephenson Countythat can accommodate fifty guests. Goose Lake, 3 port» •* miles southeast, is a great resort for sportsmen;geese, ducks and brant being very abundant. Deepriver (well named, as it is over 15 feet deep) hasrecently been, by the State Fish Commissioner,stocked with young California salmon. Along theriver, Indian mounds and the remains of ancientmining operations are found. Delmar, 171 miles from Chicago, is at the junc-tion of the Davenport & St. Paul R. R, and hasabout 600 inhabitants, one school, one church,(Methodist), a public hall and library, one news-paper, and two hotels—The Junction, and TheRiggs. Maquoketa river is 4 miles, and large andvaluable stone quarries %% miles distant. Maquoketa, 176 miles from Chicago, is thecounty seat of Jackson county,which was organized

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in 1847, and now has 24,000 population. The cityhas 3,000 inhabitants, is built on both sides of theMaquoketa river, and on the edge of the largestbody of timber there is in the State of Iowa (hencethey call this the timber city.) Before the rail-road was built here, steamers ran from the Missis-sippi river to this point. The city is picturesquelylocated on high bluffs, and has fine, wide, wellpaved streets. Considerable manufacturing is car-ried on in the lines of furniture, agricultural imple-ments, and other articles, in which wood is largelyused. The city has one school house that cost,000, and several cheaper ones, six hotels, a finecounty court house, four flour mills, two woolenmills, a tannery, three banks, four churches, and alarge number of fine business houses. Two medici-nal springs within the city limits have large localrepute. Two miles off is an Indian burial ground.The business of this city for 1875 showed overthirty-three per cent, increase over 1874. Nashville, 18

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Latest Chicago Streeterville News

Travellers’ Decorated Caravan
Chicago Streeterville
Image by National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Family in their decorated caravan en route to the Cahirmee Horse Fair at Buttevant, Co. Cork.

Thanks to Frank Fullard for letting us know that "the fair of Cahirmee (which is now actually held in Buttevant) is still going strong and the members of the travelling community are still as much a part of it as ever." In fact, Frank took some great photos at the Fair in 2011

Date: July 1954

NLI Ref.: WIL m12[54]

Latest Chicago Streeterville News

Punch and Judy?
Chicago Streeterville
Image by National Library of Ireland on The Commons
We visited the Ladies’ Bathing Place at Portrush, Co. Antrim a while ago, but this "Bathing Place" seems to be for all inhabitants and visitors to Portrush.

Looks as if they’re waiting for a Punch & Judy Show, or some form of children’s entertainment from the chap in tights with the fiddle/violin?

Date: 1900??

NLI Ref.: EAS_0692

Latest Chicago River North News

Image from page 495 of “History of Nebraska from the earliest explorations of the trans-Mississippi region” (1918)
Chicago
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Identifier: historyofnebrask00mort
Title: History of Nebraska from the earliest explorations of the trans-Mississippi region
Year: 1918 (1910s)
Authors: Morton, J. Sterling (Julius Sterling), 1832-1902 Watkins, Albert, 1848-1923 Thomas, Augustus Orloff, 1863-1935 Beattie, James A., 1845- Wakeley, Arthur Cooper, 1855-
Subjects: Nebraska — History
Publisher: Lincoln, Neb., Western Publishing and Engraving Company

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to the southern route was demoral-ized where it was not devastated by warthe other hand, the great natural I Matte riverroute was in direct line westward with the rial tier of states of which Chicago hadalready become the commercial entrepot, and at least four trunk lines of railway from thatgreat central point would naturally reach the 47. HISTORY OF NEBRASKA Missouri river north of the line between Iowaand Missouri and within reach of the in-fluence of the Platte route magnet. The actof 1864 provided that any company having aline reaching Sioux City from the east mightbuild the Sioux City & Pacific branch. Inorder to avail themselves of lands then morevaluable than those lying across the Missouri,the builders, John I. Blair and Oakes Ames,kept the road on the Iowa side to a point op-posite Blair, and then made the connection atFremont. This branch was never a part ofthe Union Pacific system, and in 1884 it fellinto the control of the Chicago & Northwes-tern railroad company.

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Thomas C. DurantChief promoter, Union Pacific railroad There was a bitter controversy in Congressover the passage of the amendatory act of1864, and the opposition in the House was ledby two eminent members, E. B. Washburneof Illinois, a republican, and William H. Hol-man of Indiana, a democrat. Mr. Holmandemanded that provision should be made forcarrying the property and troops of the UnitedStates free of charge, and he predicted thatthe government would get nothing more inreturn for its aid. Mr. Washburne wasunsparing in denunciation of the bill, andespecially of the famous section 10, whichsubordinated the government loan to the lienof the mortgage bonds. He denounced thischange as the most monstrous and flagrantattempt to overreach the government and thepeople that can be found in all the legislative annals of the country. He questioned thatthere had been compliance with the provisionof the charter limiting the stock held by oneperson to two hundred shares, or that someof the direc

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Latest Chicago Near North Side News

Catch of the Day
Chicago Near North Side
Image by National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Four women selling fish.

Thanks to those of you who pointed out that this is Spanish Parade on the Spanish Arch side of the Claddagh in Galway City. That’s Claddagh Quay and Nimmo’s Pier in the background.

According to colman.rushe this photo is mentioned in Peadar O’Dowd’s book Down by the Claddagh, so I went off and got our copy of Down by the Claddagh (1993), and there indeed is this photo with the caption underneath:
"Bringing the fish to market: As this postcard (printed in Berlin) states, four Irish Fish Wifes make their way up along Long Walk to the fish market in front of the Spanish Arch or An Póirse Caoch (the Blind Arch) as it was known then. (Courtesy Jimmy O’Connor)

Now, a bigger challenge would be to identify some of the women, and we have received very tentative information that these women may be Nonnie O’Donnell, Mary Rodgers, Kitty Conneely and a Mrs Gill, all from the Claddagh. Does that ring any bells?

Date: Circa 1905

NLI Ref.: Eas 4055

Latest Chicago Near North Side News

Pinkeens
Chicago Near North Side
Image by National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Two little guys with their father/grandfather at the pond in Herbert Park, Dublin. One has his net for catching pinkeens, but thought the other might have been controlling a model boat?

The Pergola and covered walkway just above the far side of the pond sadly fell victim to the Snowpocalypse of winter 2010/2011 and collapsed under the weight of snow and ice. That aside, if you visit Herbert Park today, this scene is completely unchanged.

Slow Loose Chippings told us that the "pond in Herbert Park was once the mill pond for the nearby Mill at Ballsbridge" and Niall McAuley provided us with a map showing that old mill pond.

P.S. "Going fishing" myself for a few days, but will be back in action at the end of the week…

Date: Summer 1969

NLI Ref.: WIL 66[3]

Latest Chicago River North News

Image from page 160 of “Nature neighbors, embracing birds, plants, animals, minerals, in natural colors by color photography, containing articles by Gerald Alan Abbott, Dr. Albert Schneider, William Kerr Higley…and other eminent naturalists. Ed. by Nath
Chicago
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Identifier: natureneighborse03bant
Title: www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/book…
Year: 1914 (1910s)
Authors: Banta, Nathaniel Moore, 1867- Schneider, Albert, 1863- Higley, William Kerr, 1860-1908 Abbott, Gerard Alan
Subjects: Natural history
Publisher: Chicago, American Audobon association

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ould never have been suspected. THE WATER-THRUSH* The Water-thrush has so manj^ popular names that itwill be recognized by most observers by one or more ofthem. It is called small-billed water-thrush, water wagtail,water kick-up, Besoy kick-up, and river pink (Jamaica),aquatic accentor, and New York aquatic thrush. It isfound chiefly east of the Mississippi River, north to theArctic Coast, breeding from the north border of the UnitedStates northward. It winters in more southern UnitedStates, all of middle America, northern South America, andall of West Indies. It is accidental in Greenland. In Illi-nois this species is known as a migrant, passing slowlythrough in spring and fall, though in the extreme southernportion a few pass the winter, especially if the season bemild. It frequents swampy woods and open, wet places,nesting on the ground or in the roots of overturned trees atthe borders of swamps. Mr. M. K. Barnum, of Syracuse,New York, found a nest of this species in the roots of a

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